Arms of Prince Albert Edward

Edward VII

From Encyclopedia of Heraldry by John Burke and John Bernard Burke (1844)

The text gives the blazon as follows: “the Royal Arms, differenced by a label of three points and an escutcheon of pretence, for Saxony, viz. barry of ten, sable and argent, a bend treflé vert.”

I was so distracted by the fuckup on the charge of Saxony last week (seriously, how is that a cross? It’s a bend! It’s obviously a bend!) that I missed the other glaring fuckup in the blazon: sable and argent? It’s or! Saxony has never involved argent at all! Argh. Also worth noting is the escutcheon of pretense; we typically see these in the arms of men married to heiresses, but here, it indicates that Edward is also an heir to Saxony, though as a kingdom, the UK takes precedence over a duchy.

The Burkes, bless their status-obsessed little hearts, very carefully place the at-the-time infant Prince Albert Edward (who will, eventually, become Edward VII) above his father due to his status as heir apparent. Victoria and Albert’s first child, Victoria Adelaide Mary Louisa, gets her label placed just below her younger brother and just above her father, as second in line to the throne. Despite the fact that this edition was republished in 1844, it doesn’t look like anyone added the arms (or even the label) of Princess Alice, born 1843. Next week, we’ll take a look at a whole bunch of fancy labels that differentiated all the many princes and princesses of the United Kingdom in 1842.

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Arms of Rauf de Berners

Berners

From the Dering Roll (c. 1270-1300)

Blazon: Per quarterly or and vert

I did find some evidence that the manor of Berwick Berners in Essex was held by several, probably related men named Ralph de Berners. I’m guessing the second of the three (son to the first, father to the second) is the Ralph referred to here, since he was both a knight and probably alive around the time the Dering Roll was created.

Arms of Prince Albert

Prince Albert

From Encyclopedia of Heraldry by John Burke and John Bernard Burke (1844)

The Burkes give the blazon as follows:

“Quarterly, first and fourth, the Royal Arms, differenced by a label of three points, on the center point a cross gules; second and third, barry of ten, sable and argent, a cross treflé vert, for Saxony.

Supporters – Two lions rampant or, crowned proper each charged on the shoulder with a label as in the arms.”

Okay, first off, because I can’t not point it out: the charge of Saxony is not, and never has been a cross treflé (or botony, as I typically prefer.) It’s a ducal coronet (embowed or not might be a point of dispute), but it’s…. definitely not a cross. The arms of Saxony aren’t hard to find, and this is a second edition of the text, and this particular slip-up isn’t mentioned in the errata, AND they blazon it correctly (or anyway, less wrongly) on literally the same page, so I’m gonna have to blame shitty editing here. Like, come on, that is demonstrably not a cross. The artist got it right, at least.

Also, the label is worth a word. English royalty tend to use labels with differences to distinguish between the inevitably numerous heirs to the throne. We’ll see more of this a bit later on, since the Burkes have included depictions of the labels for many of the other members of the royal family. You will probably notice that Albert has a label with a difference (the cross gules) instead of the undifferentiated label of three points. This is due to the fact that, as Prince Consort, he wasn’t actually first in line to the throne. That honor goes to his and Victoria’s eldest son, Albert Edward, whom we’ll look at next week.

Arms of Bartholomew de Brianson

de Brianson

From the Dering Roll (c. 1270-1300)

Blazon: Gyronny of eight argent and azure

I do have a few records of Bartholomew de Brianson: he was summoned in 1276 to pay a debt to Edward I, which was later acquitted. There’s another from 1346, when presumably he was already deceased – the monks of Monk Bretton Priory had an endowment to pray for his soul. It seems like he was the son of John de Brianson and his wife Elizabeth, but I can’t find any evidence that Bartholomew married or had further descendents. (Pity, because I’m a sucker for gyronny; more people should have that!)

Arms of Queen Victoria

Victoria

The Burkes give the royal blazon as follows: 

Arms – Quarterly, first and fourth, gules, three lions passant guardant in pale or, for England; second, or, a lion rampant within a double tressure, flory, counterflory gules for Scotland; azure a harp or, stringed argent for Ireland; all surrounded by the Garter.

Crest – England – Upon the royal helmet, the imperial crown proper thereon a lion statant, guardant or, imperially crowned, also proper.

Supporters – Dexter, a lion rampant guardant or, crowned as the crest. Sinister, an unicorn argent armed, crined, and ungled or, gorged with a coronet composed of crosses pattée and fleurs-de-lis, a chain affixed thereto, passing between the forelegs, and reflexed over the back, also or.

Crest – Scotland – On an imperial crown proper a lion sejant affrontée gules imperially crowned or, holding in the dexter paw a sword, and in the sinister a sceptre erect, also proper.

Crest – Ireland – On a wreath, or and azure a castle, triple-towered, gold, a hart argent springing from the gate.

I’ve written out the abbreviations used – gu. into gules, pass. into passant, etc. but everything else is copied directly. I can’t quibble with the actual content of the blazon, although I would use a lot fewer commas. I’m also not sure why they give the blazons for the crests of Scotland and Ireland, but good to know, I guess.

The depictions of the royal arms are excellent examples of nineteenth-century heraldic art; whatever else I can say about the Burkes, they got some pretty good and period-typical heraldic artists. I’m planning on posting the rest of the complete achievements given for the royal family, as well as some of the labels, and possibly a few of the simple arms given for former monarchs.

Arms of Richard de Tany

de Tany

From the Dering Roll (c. 1270-1300)

Blazon: Or six eaglets sable in pile

I did find a nice grave memorial for a Richard de Tany in Hertfordshire circa 1270, but if there was a design on the shield, it’s no longer visible. It seems likely that the arms on the roll belong to either him or another Richard de Tany, probably his son, who was married to a Juliana (no surname given) and alive in 1296.

Arms of Walter Giffard

Giffard

From the Dering Roll (c. 1270-1300)

Blazon: Azure three lions passant guardant argent crowned or

There are several Giffard coats of arms with three lions passant (sometimes guardant) argent, but the field is generally gules, and the lions are not usually crowned. The first creation of the Earl of Buckingham, which applied to two Walter Giffards, was extinguished in 1164 when the son died without issue. This means I can’t find a Walter Giffard alive around the same time as the Dering Roll was published, so I’m not entirely sure where this comes from – though I think it is worth noting the original Walter Giffard, Lord of Longueville, was from Normandy, the region of gules two lions passant guardant (sometimes crowned) or.