Arms of the House of Appiani

Appiani

In use since at least 1322?

Blazon: Lozengy argent and gules

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Arms of Kevelioc and Lucye

Kevelioc and Lucye

Arms of Hugh de Kevelioc, Earl of Chester 1153-1181 (1147-1181) and ‘Beatrix Lucye’

From p43 of Lacies Nobilitie by Sir John Ferne (1586)

Blazon: Per pale baron and femme; the first azure three garbs or, the second gules three lucies hauriant argent

Ferne seems to include Hugh mostly to castigate him for his role in revolting against Henry II in 1173. Once again, Ferne’s information on the wife seems to be inaccurate; Kevelioc married Bertrade de Montfort, who seems to have been a French noblewoman (at least, her grandfather certainly held land in Normandy). However, Ferne clearly believes that Kevelioc married into the Lucy family, regardless of the fact that Kevelioc’s granddaughter Margaret de Quincy’s later married into the same family.

Arms of de Gernon and Gloucester

de Gernon and Gloucester
Arms of Ranulf de Gernon, Earl of Chester 1128-1153 (1099-1153) and Maud of Gloucester (?-1189)

From p43 of Lacies Nobilitie by Sir John Ferne (1586)

Blazon: Per pale baron and femme; the first azure three garbs or, the second or three chevronels gules

The arms Ferne gives for Maud (whom he calls Alice) seem to be skipping ahead a few decades. The chevronels are well-known as the arms of the Clare family, who would inherit the earldom of Gloucester in 1225. Maud’s father Robert was the first earl of Gloucester and (probably) the first illegitimate son of Henry I. Since he was born before his father ascended the throne, it is unknown if he bore arms or what they would have been.

Arms of Nicholas Malmains

Malmains

From the Dering Roll (c. 1270-1300)

Blazon: Gules three dexter hands erect in pale argent

This representation does not have the charges in the correct position; in order to be in pale, they should form a vertical line down the center of the shield, like the ordinary. Alternatively, the blazon may be incorrect; it may be attempting to describe the charges as “in pile.”