Arms of Ferrers and Chester

Ferrers and Chester

Arms of William de Ferrers, Earl of Derby 1199-1247 (c. 1168-1247) and Agnes of Chester (?-1247)

From p43 of Lacies Nobilitie by Sir John Ferne (1586)

Blazon: Per pale baron and femme; the first argent six horseshoes sable, the second azure three garbs or

There are several competing opinions on the “true” arms of the Ferrers family. The horseshoes shown here (or some variation thereof) are usually considered to be canting arms (for “farrier”), and different authorities will argue accordingly; if the source in question takes a dim view of canting arms, the blazon given is usually “vairy or and gules.” Ferne falls into the pro-horseshoe camp, arguing that the vairy was adopted by “Henry Earle Ferrers… for the affection which he bare to his wife and her family,” which makes the horseshoe coat “their most auntient Coate, and the signe and representation of theyr service done to their Soveraigne.” (67) He also touches on the canting arms debate, saying that “those families which beare Armes alluding to their names… are both honorable and auntient.” (68)

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Arms of the House of Barberini

Barberini

In use since 1530?

Blazon: Azure three bees volant or

The House of Barberini was founded by Antonio Barberini, a Florentine merchant dealing in grain, wool, and textiles, in the mid-16th century, likely between 1530 and 1559. They are probably best known for Pope Urban VIII, formerly Maffeo Barberini, who was somewhat infamous for nepotism, and the Palazzo Barberini, which was finished by Bernini in 1633.

Before they rose to prominence, their surname was “Tafani” (horseflies), which were also allegedly the original charges in their arms.

Arms of Louis d’Appiani d’Aragon

Louis d'Appiani

(1533-1592)

Blazon: Per quarterly I and IV  lozengy argent and gules (Appiani), II and III per quarterly i and iv tierced per pale 1 barry of eight gules and argent (Hungary ancien), 2 azure semé de lis or (France ancien), and 3 argent a cross paté between four crosses or (Jerusalem), ii and iii or four palets gules (Aragon); overall a chief gules a cross argent (Savoy)

“Louis” appears to be Alfonso d’Appiani, brother of Jacopo VI. He seems to have been a military man, possibly serving under Ferdinando II de’ Medici, Grand Duke of Tuscany.

Arms of Huntingdon and de Blondeville

Huntingdon and de Blondeville

Arms of David of Scotland, Earl of Huntingdon 1214?-1219 (1144-1219) and Matilda de Blondeville (1171-1233)

From p43 of Lacies Nobilitie by Sir John Ferne (1586)

Blazon: Per pale baron and femme; the first argent an escutcheon within a tresseure fleury counter-fleury gules, the second azure three garbs or

As grandson of David I of Scotland and younger brother of William I of Scotland, David was entitled to bear the royal arms with a difference. Judging from Ferne’s depiction, he used two methods of differencing that are more typical of
Scottish heraldry than English: changing the tinctures and using a different charge. The tresseure and use of gules still clearly connects him to the royal family of Scotland. According to Ferne, the nontraditional differencing is due to
his royal blood, since “for the difference being little & in the feeld far off, not easely to be perceaved, should bring a confusion to the people, so that is should be difficult to them, to discerne which is their King.” (63)  He
attributes the specific choice of argent and an escutcheon to “the defense of verity, and sincere truth, signified by the cullor of white.” (65)

Arms of the House of Appiani of Aragon

Appiani of Aragon

In use since 1445?

Blazon: Per quarterly I and IV  lozengy argent and gules (Appiani), II and III per quarterly i and iv tierced per pale 1 barry of eight gules and argent (Hungary ancien), 2 azure semé de lis or (France ancien), and 3 argent a cross paté between four crosses or (Jerusalem), ii and iii or four palets gules (Aragon)

The alliance between the Appianis and the house of Aragon began (informally) in 1445, when Emanuele Appiani married Colia de’ Giudici, the illegitimate daughter of King Alfonso V of Naples. His great-grandson Jacopo V also married into the house of Aragon via Marianna of Aragon in 1510, though she died before she could bear any children.