Arms of Schwenningen, Germany

Schwenningen
In use since at least 1987; granted 1974?

Blazon: Or a fess dancetty sable

This village seems to be an entirely distinct entity from the former municipality of the same name in Schwarzwald-Baar-Kreis. The fess dancetty seems to have belong to the Werenwag family, who held the territory until it passed to Württemberg in 1805.

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Arms of Hohentengen, Germany

Hohentengen
Granted 1682

Blazon: Sable a lion rampant double-queued or bearing between the front paws an escutcheon gules a fess argent

The lion is a reference to the arms of the Habsburgs, and the escutcheon is easily recognizable as the arms of Austria. The region was under Austrian control until 1806. It is possible that this grant of arms was part of an ongoing power struggle between the local lords and the counts in Scheer; the grant may have been a show of support for the lords from Emperor Leopold I.

Arms of Diersbach, Austria

Diersbach

Granted 1984

Blazon: Gules on a fess in chief wavy argent a sword in fess, point to the sinister proper, hilted of the field; on a mount in base rayonné or a serpent glissant reguardant sable crowned of the first

The fess wavy is a canting reference to the “Bach” part of the name (meaning river or stream), and the sword is the symbol of St. Martin, the village’s patron saint. The snake is a reference to a local legend of a treasure hidden in the nearby castle Waldeck and guarded by crowned serpents.

Arms of Lucas de Viene

Viene
From the Dering Roll (c. 1270-1300)

Blazon: Azure crusilly and a fess dancetty argent

Lucas de Viene (also spelled Vyenne) was a lord of two manors in Sussex, Putwood and Cudlow. He also apparently had enough of a rivalry with John de Bohun that the latter and several of his servants ambushed the former and ducked him in a horse pond.

Hohentengen

Granted 1682

Blazon: Sable a lion rampant double-queued or bearing between the front paws an escutcheon gules a fess argent (Austria)

The lion is a reference to the arms of the Habsburgs, and the escutcheon is easily recognizable as the arms of Austria. The region was under Austrian control until 1806. It is possible that this grant of arms was part of an ongoing power struggle between the local lords and the counts in Scheer; the grant may have been a show of support for the lords from Emperor Leopold I.

Arms of Marie de’Medici

Medici

(1575-1672)

Blazon: Per quarterly I and IV o five torteaux in orle, in chief a roundel of France (Medici), II and III gules a fess argent (Austria)

These are Marie’s arms from before her marriage. In a classic example of quartering, the first and fourth quarters display the arms of her father, Francesco I de’Medici, Grand Duke of Tuscany, while the second and third come from her mother, Archduchess Joanna of Austria. Since both parents were armigers, all of their children would have been entitled to bear their arms quartered. Upon marrying King Henry IV of France, she would have quartered his arms in the first and fourth quarters with the above arms in the second and third.