Arms of Stetten am kaleten Markt, Germany

Stetten am kaleten Markt

Granted 1978?

Blazon: Per quarterly argent and gules a cross quarterly counterchanged

These are potentially a variation on the arms of the bishopric of Constance (argent a cross gules.) The town belonged to the monastery of Reichenau from 799 until until about the 13th century, and the monastery was subsequently ceded to Constance. It’s possible that later researchers conflated the two.

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Arms of Dobl, Austria

Dobl

Granted 1962

Blazon: Per fess argent a stag’s attires gules and vert a hunting horn of the first

The nearby forest, the Kaiserwald, was frequently used for hunting since the 13th century, which is reflected in the charges here.

Arms of Terrinches, Spain

Terrinches
Granted 1988

Blazon: Per pale argent a cross of Santiago gules and azure a tower of the first

These may partly be canting arms, as “Terrinches” may be derived from “Torreblanca,” or “white tower.” Alternatively, the sinister half of the arms may be a reference to the town’s defensive importance during the Reconquista. The dexter half reflects the town’s previous ownership by the Order of Santiago.

Arms of Simaringendorf, Germany

Simaringendorf
In use since at least 2008

Blazon: Per fess I per bend sinister gules two hammers in saltire or and of the last a plowshare of the first, II of the first a stag statant of the second

The stag is drawn from the arms of the county that shares its name with the village, while the hammers represent the local steelworks and the plowshare stands for agriculture.

Arms of Schwenningen, Germany

Schwenningen
In use since at least 1987; granted 1974?

Blazon: Or a fess dancetty sable

This village seems to be an entirely distinct entity from the former municipality of the same name in Schwarzwald-Baar-Kreis. The fess dancetty seems to have belong to the Werenwag family, who held the territory until it passed to W├╝rttemberg in 1805.