Arms of Brittany, France

Brittany

In use since at least 1316

Blazon: Ermine

Oh, Bretagne. Never change. (I mean, you haven’t since around the fourteenth century, and even then, not by much.) The first arms I can find belonging to Brittany are those of Peter I, Duke of Brittany, also known as Peter de Dreux or Peter Mauclerc (i.e. “bad cleric”; he dropped out of his clerical career.) His arms were chequy of or and azure within a bordure gules, a canton ermine. The canton was added as a difference, possibly as a reference to his brief stint as a man of the cloth. Allegedly, the pure white of ermine was supposed to be a reference to the moral purity of the Church, though I’m skeptical of this attribution. Peter’s great-great-grandson, Jean III, dropped the chequy-and-bordure of Dreux in favor of the ermine canton in 1316, but no one seems to know why. Given that the decision has persisted for literally more than 700 years, I’m inclined to say it was a good one.

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Arms of the Earl and Countess of Lincoln

Lincoln
Arms of John de Lacy, Earl of Lincoln 1232-1240 (c. 1192-1240) and Margaret de Quincy, Countess of Lincoln 1232-1266, suo jure 1240-1266 (c. 1206-1266)

From p114 of Lacies Nobilitie by Sir John Ferne (1586)

Blazon: Per pale baron and femme I per quarterly i and iv per quarterly or and gules a bend sable and a label of three points argent (Lacy), ii and iii or a lion rampant purpre (Nigold/Neale), II per quarterly i gules seven mascles conjoined or 3, 3, and 1 (Quincy), ii per pale azure three garbs or (Chester) and azure a wolf’s head erased argent (d’Avranches), iii gules a cinquefoil ermine (Beaumont), iv gules a pale or (Grandmesnil)

You may recognize the baron’s arms as those of Roger de Lacy, Baron of Halton and Pontefract; John was his eldest son. They were jointly created Countess and Earl of Lincoln in 1232. The grant was mostly due to Margaret, as the title had previously been held by her mother Hawise of Chester. Thus, John was only Earl of Lincoln by right of his wife, and when he died in 1240, she retained her title in her own right.

Arms of Birmingham, England

Birmingham

Granted 1977

Blazon: Per quarterly I and IV azure a bend of five lozenges conjoined or, II and III per pale indented or and gules, overall on a cross ermine a mitre proper

Crest: On a wreath or and azure issuant from a mural crown or charged with a Tudor rose a dexter arm embowed holding a hammer all proper

Supporters: On the dexter a figure representing Art proper vested argent wreathed with laurel vert tied by a riband gules, holding in the sinister hand resting on the shield a book bound of the last and in the dexter a palette with two brushes proper; on the sinister a figure representing Industry habited as a smith, holding in the dexter hand resting on the shield a cupel and in the sinister a hammer resting on an anvil all proper

Mantling: Azure lined or

Motto: Forward

Both coats quartered here were used by the de Bermingham family at various points in time. The family also quartered the coats, but in opposite quarters; the city changed the order for difference. The city was previously granted arms in 1889, which used a fess ermine instead of a cross, and a mural crown instead of a mitre. The supporters in the previous arms were also reversed, with Industry on the dexter and Art on the sinister.

Arms of la Zouche and de Quincy

Zouche and Quincy

Arms of Alan la Zouche (1205-1270) and Ellen de Quincy (?-1296)

From p81 of Lacies Nobilitie by Sir John Ferne (1586)

Blazon: Per pale baron and femme gules thirteen bezants 4, 3, 3, 2, and 1 and a canton ermine and gules seven mascles conjoined or 3, 3, and 1

The la Zouche arms have virtually always involved some number of bezants, but how many depends greatly on the source. The most common is probably ten in pile or 4, 3, 2, and 1, but thirteen or fourteen also occur, and some authorities simply describe them as bezanté, or deliberately unspecified.

Arms of the Royal Borough of Kingston upon Thames

Kingston upon Thames

London, England

Granted 1966

Blazon: Azure three salmon naiant in pale argent finned and tailed gules

Crest: On a wreath of the colors issuant from a wreath of bay leaves vert banded or a demi-stag proper gorged with a crown of or pendant therefrom an escutcheon ermine on a chevron vert between two chevronels the chief per pale azure and gules, the base per pale gules and azure, a cross paté or, holding between the forelegs a fountain

Supporters: Two stags proper gorged with a ribbon argent pendant therefrom an escutcheon azure issuant from the base an elm tree proper in front of a sun rising or and resting the interior hind hoof on a charred woodstock proper

Compartment*: A grassy mount proper supported by a fillet wavy pre fess wavy argent and azure

Mantling: Azure lined argent

The arms are derived from the historical arms of the borough, recorded as far back as 1572; the three salmon refer to three fisheries mentioned in the Domesday Book. The escutcheon on the crest bears the arms of the Borough of Malden and Coombe, and the supporters’ escutcheons show the arms of the Borough of Surbiton.

*Compartments are usually left to the discretion of the artist, not specified in the blazon.

Arms of de Montfort and de Beaumont

Montfort and Beaumont

Arms of Simon de Montfort (? – 1188) and Amicia de Beaumont (unknown)

From p81 of Lacies Nobilitie by Sir John Ferne (1586)

Blazon: Per pale baron and femme gules a lion rampant double-queued argent and gules a cinquefoil ermine

After Amicia’s brother,  Robert de Beaumont, died in 1204, his title of Earl of Leicester passed to Amicia and Simon’s son, also named Simon. However, the younger Simon lost the earldom in 1215 when King John granted it to Ranulf de Blondeville, Earl of Chester. The younger Simon had two sons – Amaury and yet another Simon. This last Simon (Amicia’s grandson) would later convince Ranulf to cede the earldom to him in 1238, though his later rebellion against the king in the Second Baron’s War would result in the return of the title to the crown from 1265 until 1267.

Arms of de Quincy and de Beaumont

Quincy and Beaumont

Arms of Saer de Quincy, Earl of Winchester and (1170 – 1219) and Margaret de Beaumont (unknown)

From p81 of Lacies Nobilitie by Sir John Ferne (1586)

Blazon: Per pale baron and femme gules seven mascles 3, 3, and 1 or and gules a cinquefoile ermine

Since Saer de Quincy married one of the two heiresses of the de Beaumont family, he was entitled to bear the arms of the Beaumonts marshalled with his own. (Margaret’s brother, Robert de Beaumont, Earl of Leicester, died in 1204.) However, since Margaret was the younger sister, the title Earl of Leicester passed to her older sister’s husband.