Arms of Corby Borough Council, England

Corby Borough Council

Granted 1958

Blazon: Gules a cross patonce between four oak leaves each enfiled by a ducal coronet or

Crest: On a wreath of the colors a raven wings addorsed and displayed sable, beaked, membered, gorged with a ducal coronet, and chained or, the dexter claw resting on a gad of steel proper

Mantling: Gules lined or

Motto: Deeds not words

Arms of Gilbert de Gant

de Gant

Earl of Kyme and Baron of Lindsey (1040-1095)

From p30 of Lacies Nobilitie by Sir John Ferne (1586)

Blazon: Or three barrulets azure surmounted by a bend gules

According to Ferne’s mouthpiece Paradius, de Gant was ennobled by William the Conqueror. (No exact date is given, but it seems likely this occurred before the compiliation of the Domesday Book in 1086.) Ferne does not mention that Gant was related to William the Conqueror, but his displeasure towards the newly created Norman nobles is palpable.

Paradius asserts a few interesting things about this coat. First, he claims that the bend was added for differencing, saying that “those which we now call the ordinary charges were in olde time used commonly for differences of familyes and brethren.” (29) He devotes two and a half pages to the alleged symbolism of the arms, giving the origin of the barrulets (then called bars) as “great peeces of tymber… [used] to stop and debarre the enemye from his entraunce…”, which “may be well applyed unto him, whose invention, industrye, or labour, hath so secured and fortified the Campe,” or to others who have, through might or strategy, prevented an enemy from gaining
a foothold in their country. The fact that the bars are azure, the color of the sky, apparently indicates that “the force of wisdom prevaileth in times of peace, to
stop the enterprises of enemies.” The bend, on the other hand, is supposed to designate that the bearer was one of the first to overcome the enemy’s wall; its color shows that he “did not win the wal from the enemy, but by great bloudshed, stout and couragious fight.” (29-31)