Arms of Lacy and Quincy

Lacy and Quincy

Arms of John de Lacy, Earl of Lincoln 1232-1240 (1192-1240) and Margaret de Quincy, Countess of Lincoln 1232-1266 (c. 1206-1266)

From p43 of Lacies Nobilitie by Sir John Ferne (1586)

Blazon: Per pale baron and femme; the first per quarterly or and gules a bend sable overall a label of three points argent, the second gules six mascles 3, 3, and 1 or

Advertisements

Arms of Albaladejo, Spain

Albaladejo

Arms of Albaladejo, Spain

Granted 1995

Blazon: Or a bend vert between in chief a castle triple-towered and in base a cross of Santiago gules

An investigation begun in 1995 found that the city of Albaladejo had not previously used its own arms. The city subsequently adopted the arms shown here, with the castle symbolizing the ancient Roman fortress, and the cross of Santiago the local parish of St. James the Apostle. Given that the bend was used to represent the ancient road that gave the city its name (from the Arabic “albalá”, or “road”), these may be considered canting arms.

Arms of Oadby and Wigston Borough Council, England

Oadby and Wigston

In use since 1974?

Blazon: Per quarterly gules and vert on a bend or between II and III two bars gemelles or surmounted by a pile reversed argent, a lion’s gamb erased gules armed azure between two cinquefoils pierced ermine

Crest: On a wreath argent and gules an owl close affronté supporting between its wings a pelt charged with a shuttle erect, all proper

Supporters: On the dexter a lamb guardant argent; on the sinister a tiger guardant, the tail reflexed up along the exterior thigh proper

Mantling: Gules lined argent

Motto: Obtain wisdom

Arms of Rene Potier

Potier

Count of Tresmes 1630-1648, duke of Tresmes 1648-1669 (1579-1670)

Blazon: Per quarterly I azure a bend argent* between two wyverns rampant or (Baillet), II or in the dexter corner of a chief gules an escutcheon of Montmorency, the dexter chief quarter argent a molet of five points sable (Aunoy), III or a cross gules between sixteen alerions azure (Montmorency), IV argent a chief gules surmounted by a lion rampant azure (Vendôme), overall in the fess point an escutcheon azure three dexter hands couped or surmounted by a quarter chequy of argent and the field (Potier)

*Although it is shown here as or, the blazon specifies argent.

Arms of de Gant and Roumare

Gant and Roumare

Arms of Gilbert de Gant, Earl of Lincoln c. 1149-1156 and Baron of Lindsey 1095-1156 (c. 1126-1156), and ‘Hawise de Roumare’

From p30 of Lacies Nobilitie by Sir John Ferne (1586)

Blazon: Per pale, baron and femme; the first or three barrulets azure surmounted by a bend gules, the second gules seven mascles 3, 3, and 1 between ten cross crosslets or 3, 4, 2, and 1

Ferne asserts that Gilbert married one Hawise de Roumare, William’s daughter, and thereby obtained the title Earl of Lincoln. This does not seem to be borne out by the historical record. First, William de Roumare only had one recorded child, a son who was also named William. Hawise was the name of de Roumare’s wife, so Ferne may be conflating the two. Moreover, Gilbert de Gant certainly did not marry into the earldom; when de Roumare took the Empress Matilda’s side during the Anarchy, King Stephen granted the title to de Gant (around 1149 or 1150). Ferne goes out of his way to insist that King Stephen only created de Gant Earl of Lincoln after he married de Roumare’s daughter in accordance with the laws of marriage and inheritance, but given that there is no evidence of a Roumare daughter, this seems improbable (and probably colored by Ferne’s open disdain for King Stephen). He may be conflating de Gant’s wife with Hawise of Chester, who was created the first countess of Lincoln in her own right in 1232.

Arms of ‘Randolph Fitzwright’ and ‘Maud de Gant’

Fitzwright Gant

From p30 of Lacies Nobilitie by Sir John Ferne (1586)

Blazon: Per pale, baron and femme; the first gules two bendlets engrailed vert, the second or three barrulets azure surmounted by a bend gules

Ferne presents the coat without any special commentary, besides noting that Gilbert de Gant had chosen to bestow the earldom on his daughter rather than on his son Walter – an unusual choice for the time, and evidently intended to make her more marriageable. Unfortunately, I cannot find any evidence that either of the individuals to whom these arms are attributed existed. It does not seem that, as Ferne asserts, Gilbert de Gant had a daughter named Maud, and even Ferne seems to gloss over the Fitzwright family; it takes less than a full sentence for the earldom of Kyme to pass through the Fitzwrights and to the Umfravilles, whose male line would eventually die out. It might be feasible that Ferne mixed up the names, and meant to write that Lucy, William de Gant’s sister, brought her titles into the Umfraville family; however, the text refers to Fitzwright and Robert Umfravill, Earl of Angus as distinct individuals.