Arms of the Earl and Countess of Lincoln

Lincoln
Arms of John de Lacy, Earl of Lincoln 1232-1240 (c. 1192-1240) and Margaret de Quincy, Countess of Lincoln 1232-1266, suo jure 1240-1266 (c. 1206-1266)

From p114 of Lacies Nobilitie by Sir John Ferne (1586)

Blazon: Per pale baron and femme I per quarterly i and iv per quarterly or and gules a bend sable and a label of three points argent (Lacy), ii and iii or a lion rampant purpre (Nigold/Neale), II per quarterly i gules seven mascles conjoined or 3, 3, and 1 (Quincy), ii per pale azure three garbs or (Chester) and azure a wolf’s head erased argent (d’Avranches), iii gules a cinquefoil ermine (Beaumont), iv gules a pale or (Grandmesnil)

You may recognize the baron’s arms as those of Roger de Lacy, Baron of Halton and Pontefract; John was his eldest son. They were jointly created Countess and Earl of Lincoln in 1232. The grant was mostly due to Margaret, as the title had previously been held by her mother Hawise of Chester. Thus, John was only Earl of Lincoln by right of his wife, and when he died in 1240, she retained her title in her own right.

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Arms of Ostrach, Germany

Ostrach
Granted 1978

Blazon: Per fess argent a spearhead bendwise, point in chief gules and sable a bend chequy argent and gules

The spearhead derives from the arms of a local nobleman, Schwendi von Ostrach; one seal of his arms dates to 1309. The bend chequy comes from the arms of the abbey of Salem, who owned the town from the 13th through 19th centuries. The bend has its ultimate origins in the arms of St. Bernard of Clairvaux, who founded the Cistercian order to which the abbey belongs.

Arms of de Lacy and de Quincy

Lacy and Quincy

Arms of John de Lacy, Earl of Lincoln 1232-1240 (c. 1192-1240) and Margaret de Quincy, Countess of Lincoln 1240-1266 (c. 1206-1266)

From p122 of Lacies Nobilitie by Sir John Ferne (1586)

Blazon: Per pale baron and femme  or and gules a bend sable and a label of three points argent (Lacy) and  gules seven mascles conjoined or 3, 3, and 1

The title to the earldom of Lincoln was carried through Margaret’s side, inherited from her mother, Hawise of Chester, who inherited the title from her brother Ranulf de Blondeville. As Margaret was the one with the initial right to the title, it returned to her in her own right after John died.

Arms of Roger de Lacy

Lacy
Baron of Halton 1199-1211 (1170-1211)

From p122 of Lacies Nobilitie by Sir John Ferne (1586)

Blazon: Per quarterly I and IV or and gules a bend sable and a label of three points argent (Lacy), II and III or a lion rampant purpre (Cotentin)

Roger received the castle and barony of Pontefract through Albreda de Lisours. (Ferne has her as Roger’s mother, but other sources point to her as his grandmother; I am not sure of their exact relationship.) He was not born a Lacy; his father, John fitz Richard, was the baron of Halton and grandson of Nigel de Cotentin. Roger assumed the Lacy name and arms as a condition of his succession to the properties of Pontefract.

Arms of Retuerta del Bullaque, Spain

Retuerta del Bullaque

Granted 1990

Blazon: Per fess argent a castle gules windowed or and of the last a bend wavy azure

The castle may be either a reference to or a representation of one of two local castles; the castle of Prim, a military residence that once hosted a meeting between Juan Prim y Prats and Pope Pius IX, or the castle Milagro (Castle of the Miracle) which was built by Rodrigo Jiménez de Rada during the Reconquista.

Arms of Birmingham, England

Birmingham

Granted 1977

Blazon: Per quarterly I and IV azure a bend of five lozenges conjoined or, II and III per pale indented or and gules, overall on a cross ermine a mitre proper

Crest: On a wreath or and azure issuant from a mural crown or charged with a Tudor rose a dexter arm embowed holding a hammer all proper

Supporters: On the dexter a figure representing Art proper vested argent wreathed with laurel vert tied by a riband gules, holding in the sinister hand resting on the shield a book bound of the last and in the dexter a palette with two brushes proper; on the sinister a figure representing Industry habited as a smith, holding in the dexter hand resting on the shield a cupel and in the sinister a hammer resting on an anvil all proper

Mantling: Azure lined or

Motto: Forward

Both coats quartered here were used by the de Bermingham family at various points in time. The family also quartered the coats, but in opposite quarters; the city changed the order for difference. The city was previously granted arms in 1889, which used a fess ermine instead of a cross, and a mural crown instead of a mitre. The supporters in the previous arms were also reversed, with Industry on the dexter and Art on the sinister.