Arms of Roger de Lacy

Lacy
Baron of Halton 1199-1211 (1170-1211)

From p122 of Lacies Nobilitie by Sir John Ferne (1586)

Blazon: Per quarterly I and IV or and gules a bend sable and a label of three points argent (Lacy), II and III or a lion rampant purpre (Cotentin)

Roger received the castle and barony of Pontefract through Albreda de Lisours. (Ferne has her as Roger’s mother, but other sources point to her as his grandmother; I am not sure of their exact relationship.) He was not born a Lacy; his father, John fitz Richard, was the baron of Halton and grandson of Nigel de Cotentin. Roger assumed the Lacy name and arms as a condition of his succession to the properties of Pontefract.

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Arms of Retuerta del Bullaque, Spain

Retuerta del Bullaque

Granted 1990

Blazon: Per fess argent a castle gules windowed or and of the last a bend wavy azure

The castle may be either a reference to or a representation of one of two local castles; the castle of Prim, a military residence that once hosted a meeting between Juan Prim y Prats and Pope Pius IX, or the castle Milagro (Castle of the Miracle) which was built by Rodrigo Jiménez de Rada during the Reconquista.

Arms of Birmingham, England

Birmingham

Granted 1977

Blazon: Per quarterly I and IV azure a bend of five lozenges conjoined or, II and III per pale indented or and gules, overall on a cross ermine a mitre proper

Crest: On a wreath or and azure issuant from a mural crown or charged with a Tudor rose a dexter arm embowed holding a hammer all proper

Supporters: On the dexter a figure representing Art proper vested argent wreathed with laurel vert tied by a riband gules, holding in the sinister hand resting on the shield a book bound of the last and in the dexter a palette with two brushes proper; on the sinister a figure representing Industry habited as a smith, holding in the dexter hand resting on the shield a cupel and in the sinister a hammer resting on an anvil all proper

Mantling: Azure lined or

Motto: Forward

Both coats quartered here were used by the de Bermingham family at various points in time. The family also quartered the coats, but in opposite quarters; the city changed the order for difference. The city was previously granted arms in 1889, which used a fess ermine instead of a cross, and a mural crown instead of a mitre. The supporters in the previous arms were also reversed, with Industry on the dexter and Art on the sinister.

Arms of Ilbert de Lacy

de Lacy

(1040?-1093?), Lord of Pontefract and Baron of Blackburnshire 1072-1093?

From p122 of Lacies Nobilitie by Sir John Ferne (1586)

Blazon: Per quarterly or and gules a bend sable and a label of three points argent

Ferne is more than willing to heap effusive praise on the Lacys via their arms. First, he claims that per quarterly is the superior division of arms, due to its resemblance to the Christian cross; then, he insists that the combination of or and gules (or Sol and Mars according to the planetary system of tinctures) represents martial prowess tempered by “constancy and faithfulnesse” (101). Finally, he asserts that the sable of the bend represents the mourning of the bearer’s enemies, which seems like a stretch.

Arms of Lacy and Longspée

Lacy and Longspee

Arms of Henry Lacy, Earl of Lincoln and Salisbury and Margaret Longspée

From p95 of Lacies Nobilitie by Sir John Ferne (1586)

Blazon: Per pale baron and femme per quarterly or and gules a bend sable overall a label of three points argent and gules and  azure six lioncels or

Ferne seems to be giving Lacy his grandfather’s arms, but there is ample evidence, including from contemporary sources, that Lacy actually used the arms or a lion rampant purpre.

Arms of Vöhrenbach, Germany

Voehrenbach

Granted 1802

Blazon: Azure on a fess wavy or a trout naiant gules

During the Peasants’ War in 1525, villagers from Vöhrenbach burned down the local castle of Neufürstenberg and killed the local lord. When the counts of Fürstenberg came back into power, they apparently decided to punish the town by changing the municipal arms to show a donkey. In reality, the donkey seems to have been used as a heraldic motif since the 14th century or so; either way, the arms shown above were granted in 1802.