Our Viscount may not wear any coronet (for he is called noble, but he may not be said princely).

– From The Blazon of Gentrie by Sir John Ferne (1586), p133

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At the first, it was merely an office of deputation… But when as that, the office of an Earl, was erected to a dignity and appointed to follow the blood of him which possessed it: then also, the title and name, of Viscount, was joined as a dignity for the posterity to inherit, and discerned, as a special degree of gentleness and
nobility.

– From The Blazon of Gentrie by Sir John Ferne (1586), p133

The honorable degree of a Baron, is so privileged, in the laws of Arms and constitutions of Caesars… yea they are said to be, of some majesty.

– From The Blazon of Gentrie by Sir John Ferne (1586), p132

But in later times, the ensigns and marks of Knighthood, by the sword, are observed, to be a girdle and sword gilded, and girded to his side: as also, a pair of spurs gilt, to signify… the reward of his horsemanship and that he is a Chevalier.

– From The Blazon of Gentrie by Sir John Ferne (1586), p109

It is forbidden the King (although many other great prerogatives adhere to his royal function) to dub a yeoman, or any other person not having a coat-armor a Knight.

– From The Blazon of Gentrie by Sir John Ferne (1586), p106