Arms of the Earl and Countess of Lincoln

Lincoln
Arms of John de Lacy, Earl of Lincoln 1232-1240 (c. 1192-1240) and Margaret de Quincy, Countess of Lincoln 1232-1266, suo jure 1240-1266 (c. 1206-1266)

From p114 of Lacies Nobilitie by Sir John Ferne (1586)

Blazon: Per pale baron and femme I per quarterly i and iv per quarterly or and gules a bend sable and a label of three points argent (Lacy), ii and iii or a lion rampant purpre (Nigold/Neale), II per quarterly i gules seven mascles conjoined or 3, 3, and 1 (Quincy), ii per pale azure three garbs or (Chester) and azure a wolf’s head erased argent (d’Avranches), iii gules a cinquefoil ermine (Beaumont), iv gules a pale or (Grandmesnil)

You may recognize the baron’s arms as those of Roger de Lacy, Baron of Halton and Pontefract; John was his eldest son. They were jointly created Countess and Earl of Lincoln in 1232. The grant was mostly due to Margaret, as the title had previously been held by her mother Hawise of Chester. Thus, John was only Earl of Lincoln by right of his wife, and when he died in 1240, she retained her title in her own right.

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Arms of Ottavio Piccolomini

Piccolomini
Duke of Amalfi 1639-1656 (1599-1656)

Blazon: Per quarterly I and IV argent on a cross azure five crescents or (Piccolomini); II and III paly of four i or four palets gules (Aragon), ii barry of eight gules and argent (Hungary ancien), iii azure semé de lis or, a label of four points gules (Anjou ancien), iv argent a cross paté between four crosses or (Jerusalem)

Ottavio inherited the quarters of Aragon, Hungary ancien, Anjou ancien, and Jerusalem from his ancestor Antonio Piccolomini d’Aragona, who married Maria d’Aragona, the illegitimate daughter of Ferdinand I of Naples. Many representations have Ferdinand’s arms in the first and third quarters, as Maria’s lineage was (though illegitimate) more noble than Antonio’s.

Arms of de Lacy and de Quincy

Lacy and Quincy

Arms of John de Lacy, Earl of Lincoln 1232-1240 (c. 1192-1240) and Margaret de Quincy, Countess of Lincoln 1240-1266 (c. 1206-1266)

From p122 of Lacies Nobilitie by Sir John Ferne (1586)

Blazon: Per pale baron and femme  or and gules a bend sable and a label of three points argent (Lacy) and  gules seven mascles conjoined or 3, 3, and 1

The title to the earldom of Lincoln was carried through Margaret’s side, inherited from her mother, Hawise of Chester, who inherited the title from her brother Ranulf de Blondeville. As Margaret was the one with the initial right to the title, it returned to her in her own right after John died.

Arms of Roger de Lacy

Lacy
Baron of Halton 1199-1211 (1170-1211)

From p122 of Lacies Nobilitie by Sir John Ferne (1586)

Blazon: Per quarterly I and IV or and gules a bend sable and a label of three points argent (Lacy), II and III or a lion rampant purpre (Cotentin)

Roger received the castle and barony of Pontefract through Albreda de Lisours. (Ferne has her as Roger’s mother, but other sources point to her as his grandmother; I am not sure of their exact relationship.) He was not born a Lacy; his father, John fitz Richard, was the baron of Halton and grandson of Nigel de Cotentin. Roger assumed the Lacy name and arms as a condition of his succession to the properties of Pontefract.

Arms of Herbert de Borgherse

Borgherse

From the Dering Roll (c. 1270-1300)

Blazon: Gules a lion rampant or, a label of three points azure

Later individuals in the de Burghersh family, including Herbert’s grandson, bear an almost identical coat, with a lion rampant double-queued. I’m not sure whether this depiction is incorrect or if the arms were later modified. The label also implies that Herbert was a younger son, but I cannot confirm this.

Arms of Ilbert de Lacy

de Lacy

(1040?-1093?), Lord of Pontefract and Baron of Blackburnshire 1072-1093?

From p122 of Lacies Nobilitie by Sir John Ferne (1586)

Blazon: Per quarterly or and gules a bend sable and a label of three points argent

Ferne is more than willing to heap effusive praise on the Lacys via their arms. First, he claims that per quarterly is the superior division of arms, due to its resemblance to the Christian cross; then, he insists that the combination of or and gules (or Sol and Mars according to the planetary system of tinctures) represents martial prowess tempered by “constancy and faithfulnesse” (101). Finally, he asserts that the sable of the bend represents the mourning of the bearer’s enemies, which seems like a stretch.

Arms of Lacy and Longspée

Lacy and Longspee

Arms of Henry Lacy, Earl of Lincoln and Salisbury and Margaret Longspée

From p95 of Lacies Nobilitie by Sir John Ferne (1586)

Blazon: Per pale baron and femme per quarterly or and gules a bend sable overall a label of three points argent and gules and  azure six lioncels or

Ferne seems to be giving Lacy his grandfather’s arms, but there is ample evidence, including from contemporary sources, that Lacy actually used the arms or a lion rampant purpre.