Arms of Stetten am kaleten Markt, Germany

Stetten am kaleten Markt

Granted 1978?

Blazon: Per quarterly argent and gules a cross quarterly counterchanged

These are potentially a variation on the arms of the bishopric of Constance (argent a cross gules.) The town belonged to the monastery of Reichenau from 799 until until about the 13th century, and the monastery was subsequently ceded to Constance. It’s possible that later researchers conflated the two.

Arms of Felice Rospigliosi

Rospigliosi

(1639-1688)

Blazon: Per pale azure six molets of as many points in pile argent within a bordure indented throughout of the first and the second and per quarterly or and azure, four lozenges counterchanged

The arms on the dexter half of the shield are those of the Altieri family. This may be due to the fact that Felice Rospigliosi, the brother of Pope Clement IX, was elevated to cardinal by Pope Clement X (born Emilio Altieri) in 1673.

Arms of Terrinches, Spain

Terrinches
Granted 1988

Blazon: Per pale argent a cross of Santiago gules and azure a tower of the first

These may partly be canting arms, as “Terrinches” may be derived from “Torreblanca,” or “white tower.” Alternatively, the sinister half of the arms may be a reference to the town’s defensive importance during the Reconquista. The dexter half reflects the town’s previous ownership by the Order of Santiago.

Arms of Simaringendorf, Germany

Simaringendorf
In use since at least 2008

Blazon: Per fess I per bend sinister gules two hammers in saltire or and of the last a plowshare of the first, II of the first a stag statant of the second

The stag is drawn from the arms of the county that shares its name with the village, while the hammers represent the local steelworks and the plowshare stands for agriculture.

Arms of Jon de la Mare

de la Mare

From the Dering Roll (c. 1270-1300)

Blazon: Gules a maunch argent

Either this Jo[h]n de la Mare or his son of the same name was responsible for building Nunney Castle in Somerset. Eventually, Nunney Castle and the other lordships held by the de la Mares passed to William Paulet, Marquess of Winchester.

Arms of the Earl and Countess of Lincoln

Lincoln
Arms of John de Lacy, Earl of Lincoln 1232-1240 (c. 1192-1240) and Margaret de Quincy, Countess of Lincoln 1232-1266, suo jure 1240-1266 (c. 1206-1266)

From p114 of Lacies Nobilitie by Sir John Ferne (1586)

Blazon: Per pale baron and femme I per quarterly i and iv per quarterly or and gules a bend sable and a label of three points argent (Lacy), ii and iii or a lion rampant purpre (Nigold/Neale), II per quarterly i gules seven mascles conjoined or 3, 3, and 1 (Quincy), ii per pale azure three garbs or (Chester) and azure a wolf’s head erased argent (d’Avranches), iii gules a cinquefoil ermine (Beaumont), iv gules a pale or (Grandmesnil)

You may recognize the baron’s arms as those of Roger de Lacy, Baron of Halton and Pontefract; John was his eldest son. They were jointly created Countess and Earl of Lincoln in 1232. The grant was mostly due to Margaret, as the title had previously been held by her mother Hawise of Chester. Thus, John was only Earl of Lincoln by right of his wife, and when he died in 1240, she retained her title in her own right.