Arms of Roger de Lacy

Lacy
Baron of Halton 1199-1211 (1170-1211)

From p122 of Lacies Nobilitie by Sir John Ferne (1586)

Blazon: Per quarterly I and IV or and gules a bend sable and a label of three points argent (Lacy), II and III or a lion rampant purpre (Cotentin)

Roger received the castle and barony of Pontefract through Albreda de Lisours. (Ferne has her as Roger’s mother, but other sources point to her as his grandmother; I am not sure of their exact relationship.) He was not born a Lacy; his father, John fitz Richard, was the baron of Halton and grandson of Nigel de Cotentin. Roger assumed the Lacy name and arms as a condition of his succession to the properties of Pontefract.

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For the Duke of Normandy did bear in his targe of Mars 2 Lions passant guardant of the Sun… and then, by the marriage of Eleanor, daughter and heir to William Duke of Aquitaine (that bare in a Shield gules, a Lion passant, guardant Or) the third Lion was also added to the coat of Normandy.

– From Lacies Nobilitie by Sir John Ferne (1586), p105-6

This is one of my favorite heraldic origin stories, not least because it’s very likely to be true. The blazons for Normandy and Aquitaine are easily verifiable, and the combination of those two arms into England’s iconic coat is elegant and satisfying.

Arms of Nigel of Cotentin

Cotentin
Baron of Halton c. 1071-1080 (?-1080)

From p122 of Lacies Nobilitie by Sir John Ferne (1586)

Blazon: Or a lion rampant purpre

According to Ferne, Nigel was granted the barony of Halton by his cousin Hugh Lupus for his service against the Welsh at the Battle of Rhuddlan. He also held the office of constable of Chester.

Arms of the borough of Amber Valley

Amber Valley

Derbyshire, England

Granted 1989

Blazon: Vert a pale wavy or within a bordure argent charged with five horseshoes sable, on a chief of the second between two lozenges a cresset sable fired proper

Crest: On a wreath of the colors the battlements of a tower proper issuant therefrom between two croizers or an oak tree also proper fructed and ensigned by a crown of fleurs-de-lis of the first

Supporters: On the dexter a unicorn argent armed and crined or gorged with a collar pendant therefrom a cross flory gules; on the sinister a leopard proper gorged with a collar gules pendant therefrom a fleur-de-lis or

Mantling: Vert lined or

Motto: Per laborem progredimur (By hard work we progress)

The pale wavy evidently represents the river Amber, while the lozenges and cresset symbolize the coal and iron industries. The horseshoes on the bordure are taken from (one of the versions of) the arms of the Ferrers family.

Arms of Herbert de Borgherse

Borgherse

From the Dering Roll (c. 1270-1300)

Blazon: Gules a lion rampant or, a label of three points azure

Later individuals in the de Burghersh family, including Herbert’s grandson, bear an almost identical coat, with a lion rampant double-queued. I’m not sure whether this depiction is incorrect or if the arms were later modified. The label also implies that Herbert was a younger son, but I cannot confirm this.

Hohentengen

Granted 1682

Blazon: Sable a lion rampant double-queued or bearing between the front paws an escutcheon gules a fess argent (Austria)

The lion is a reference to the arms of the Habsburgs, and the escutcheon is easily recognizable as the arms of Austria. The region was under Austrian control until 1806. It is possible that this grant of arms was part of an ongoing power struggle between the local lords and the counts in Scheer; the grant may have been a show of support for the lords from Emperor Leopold I.

Wherefore the bearing of this beast, was fitly applied to a king’s progeny: fortitude and magnanimity is denoted in the Lion.

– From Lacies Nobilitie by Sir John Ferne (1586), p91

[In reference to the arms of William Longspée] While Longspée seems to have been an adept military commander, it is more likely that the lioncels are a reference to the English royal arms than any personal characteristics.