Arms of Hugh de Bussey

Hugh de Bussey

From the Dering Roll (c. 1270-1300)

Blazon: Or three water-bougets azure

I did find a considerable history of a de Bussey family, including a Hughs/Hugos/Huges that was alive at the approximate time the Dering Roll was produced… and they all lived in Lincolnshire. It’s not impossible that the de Bussey referred to here is part of the same family, but I’m skeptical, especially since the Lincolnshire de Busseys bore barry argent and sable. That being said, seven or eight hundred years of heraldic history does tend to scramble things a bit.

It’s possible that these are intended to be canting arms – “bouget” is fairly similar to the alternate surname given on the roll, “de Boues.”

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Arms of Hamon Bonet

Hamon Bonet

From the Dering Roll (c. 1270-1300)

Blazon: Chequy gules and or a chief azure

The Bonets were a family of knights hailing from Sussex. In addition to Hamon, we also have records of a Sir Robert Bonet as owning Wappingthorn Manor in Steyning. The family continued to hold the manor until the mid-1360s, when it passed to the Wilcombe family, who had married into the Bonets. By 1399, the Wilcombes had lost possession of Wappingthorn to the Codingtons, though it was back with Alice Wilcombe and her husband John Leeds by 1427.

Arms of William de Bodham

de Bodham

Arms of Willem de Bodiham from the Dering Roll (c. 1270-1300)

Blazon: Argent a bordure gules bezanté

The Bodham family appears to have been located in Norfolk since at least the early eleventh through the fourteenth centuries. Someone named Ralph held the manor of Bodham under Hugh de Montfort, thereby giving the family its name. There is another Bodham family, first recorded in 1550, but it is unclear whether they are related to the previous family. The newer line bears argent on a cross gules five molets or.

Arms of Jon de la Mare

de la Mare

From the Dering Roll (c. 1270-1300)

Blazon: Gules a maunch argent

Either this Jo[h]n de la Mare or his son of the same name was responsible for building Nunney Castle in Somerset. Eventually, Nunney Castle and the other lordships held by the de la Mares passed to William Paulet, Marquess of Winchester.

Arms of Lucas de Viene

Viene
From the Dering Roll (c. 1270-1300)

Blazon: Azure crusilly and a fess dancetty argent

Lucas de Viene (also spelled Vyenne) was a lord of two manors in Sussex, Putwood and Cudlow. He also apparently had enough of a rivalry with John de Bohun that the latter and several of his servants ambushed the former and ducked him in a horse pond.