Arms of Rottenburg am Neckar, Germany

Rottenburg am Neckar

In use since 1282

Blazon: Per fess argent and gules

These arms are apparently an even-more-simplified version of the arms of the house of Hohenberg, which are barry of four argent and gules. The family originated in Austria; though I don’t have any solid evidence, it doesn’t seem like too much of a stretch to connect their family arms to the national arms of gules a fess argent.

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Arms of Mössingen, Germany

Mossingen

Granted 1952

Blazon: Sable a bend wavy between in chief three escutcheons in pile argent, charged with 1 three antlers fesswise in pale, 2 two quarters, and 3 an eagle displayed of the field; in base a fountain of the second

The bend wavy represents the river Steinlach, while the fountain represents the local sulfur springs. The tinctures, as well as the second of the escutcheons in the dexter chief, refer to the house of Hohenzollern, which ruled the city until the early 15th century, when it was mortgaged to the house of Württemberg. The two houses continued fighting over the territory until 1441, when Württemberg finally won out. (Their arms are displayed on the first escutcheon in the dexter chief.) The final escutcheon shows the arms of Fürstenberg, and the arrangement of the three escutcheons represents the nearby mountain Dreifürstenstein, which borders the three territories of Hohenzollern, Württemberg, and Fürstenberg. There are also some representations of the arms that only show three escutcheons, without the details depicted here, which, though incomplete, would have been considerably easier to blazon.

 

Arms of Wald, Germany

Wald

Granted 1971?

Blazon: Per pale sable a bend chequy argent and gules and argent a mascle gules in base a triple mount vert

The dexter half of the arms are those of the abbey of Salem, while the sinister half is based on the arms of Burkard von Weckenstein, with the tinctures changed to avoid placing the mounts on a field gules. It should also be noted that the von Weckenstein arms are canting; the German word for “mascle” is “Wecke.”

Arms of Stetten am kaleten Markt, Germany

Stetten am kaleten Markt

Granted 1978?

Blazon: Per quarterly argent and gules a cross quarterly counterchanged

These are potentially a variation on the arms of the bishopric of Constance (argent a cross gules.) The town belonged to the monastery of Reichenau from 799 until until about the 13th century, and the monastery was subsequently ceded to Constance. It’s possible that later researchers conflated the two.

Arms of Simaringendorf, Germany

Simaringendorf
In use since at least 2008

Blazon: Per fess I per bend sinister gules two hammers in saltire or and of the last a plowshare of the first, II of the first a stag statant of the second

The stag is drawn from the arms of the county that shares its name with the village, while the hammers represent the local steelworks and the plowshare stands for agriculture.

Arms of Sauldorf, Germany

Sauldorf

Granted 1974?

Blazon: Per fess wavy argent a key bendwise ward in chief azure and of the last a demi-swan rising, wings elevated and displayed of the first

The key is potentially a counterchanged reference to the former municipality of Sauldorf, which was incorporated with five other towns in 1974. The colors of the field and the division are likely from another of these towns, Wasser. The swan may be from a third town, Rast; the nobles of that town formerly bore argent a swan close sable, legged gules.