Arms of Stetten am kaleten Markt, Germany

Stetten am kaleten Markt

Granted 1978?

Blazon: Per quarterly argent and gules a cross quarterly counterchanged

These are potentially a variation on the arms of the bishopric of Constance (argent a cross gules.) The town belonged to the monastery of Reichenau from 799 until until about the 13th century, and the monastery was subsequently ceded to Constance. It’s possible that later researchers conflated the two.

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Arms of Simaringendorf, Germany

Simaringendorf
In use since at least 2008

Blazon: Per fess I per bend sinister gules two hammers in saltire or and of the last a plowshare of the first, II of the first a stag statant of the second

The stag is drawn from the arms of the county that shares its name with the village, while the hammers represent the local steelworks and the plowshare stands for agriculture.

Arms of Schwenningen, Germany

Schwenningen
In use since at least 1987; granted 1974?

Blazon: Or a fess dancetty sable

This village seems to be an entirely distinct entity from the former municipality of the same name in Schwarzwald-Baar-Kreis. The fess dancetty seems to have belong to the Werenwag family, who held the territory until it passed to W├╝rttemberg in 1805.

Arms of Sauldorf, Germany

Sauldorf

Granted 1974?

Blazon: Per fess wavy argent a key bendwise ward in chief azure and of the last a demi-swan rising, wings elevated and displayed of the first

The key is potentially a counterchanged reference to the former municipality of Sauldorf, which was incorporated with five other towns in 1974. The colors of the field and the division are likely from another of these towns, Wasser. The swan may be from a third town, Rast; the nobles of that town formerly bore argent a swan close sable, legged gules.

Arms of Hohentengen, Germany

Hohentengen
Granted 1682

Blazon: Sable a lion rampant double-queued or bearing between the front paws an escutcheon gules a fess argent

The lion is a reference to the arms of the Habsburgs, and the escutcheon is easily recognizable as the arms of Austria. The region was under Austrian control until 1806. It is possible that this grant of arms was part of an ongoing power struggle between the local lords and the counts in Scheer; the grant may have been a show of support for the lords from Emperor Leopold I.

Arms of Ostrach, Germany

Ostrach
Granted 1978

Blazon: Per fess argent a spearhead bendwise, point in chief gules and sable a bend chequy argent and gules

The spearhead derives from the arms of a local nobleman, Schwendi von Ostrach; one seal of his arms dates to 1309. The bend chequy comes from the arms of the abbey of Salem, who owned the town from the 13th through 19th centuries. The bend has its ultimate origins in the arms of St. Bernard of Clairvaux, who founded the Cistercian order to which the abbey belongs.