Arms of the borough of Hounslow, London, England

Hounslow

Granted 1964

Blazon: Per fess azure and gules on a fess wavy between two wings conjoined in base argent surmounted by a sword erect or, in base a lion rampant guardant per fess of the fourth and third, a barrulet wavy of the first

Crest: On a wreath of the colors upon ferns proper a tablot passant sable supporting over the shoulder a post horn or

Supporters: Two griffins or gorged with collars gemel wavy azure charged on the wings with as many seaxes

Mantling: Azure lined argent

Motto: Juncti progrediamur (Let us go forward together)

The wings and sword represent London Airport and the aircraft industry. The lion is from the arms of Hounslow Priory. The fess and barrulet(s) are from the  Borough of Brentford and Chiswick, representing the rivers Brent and Thames

The blazon specifies one barrulet, but this depiction shows two. Either the number of the barrulets or the descriptor is off; it could be a barrulet gemel, which would be indicated by the collars on the supporters.

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Arms of Vellberg, Germany

Vellberg

Granted 1936

Blazon: Azure a sinister wing argent and a canton or

There are records of a Vellberg family dating back to 1102, but the line died out in 1592, and Schwäbisch Hall purchased the city in 1595.

 

Arms of London, England

London

Granted 1957; in use since before 1483

Blazon: Argent a cross gules in the first quarter a sword in pale point in chief of the last

Crest: On a wreath of the colors a dragon’s sinister wing argent charged with a cross gules

Supporters: Two dragons argent charged on the wings with a cross gules

Mantling: Gules lined argent

Motto: Domine dirige nous (God direct us)

Most of the imagery in the arms of London is connected to the patron saint of England, Saint George, and his legendary slaying of the dragon. The saint’s symbol is argent, a cross gules, which recurs throughout the arms, as does the dragon. The sword is a symbol of St. Paul, to whom the first cathedral in London was dedicated.

I couldn’t not do London. I mean, they’re famous (as famous as arms get, anyways) with a shitton of religious iconography, so I couldn’t ignore them. What I did not expect to find, though, was that the arms were not confirmed until 195freaking7. That’s over five centuries of continuous use, predating the English College of Arms itself, and no one thought to give the capital city of freaking England a grant until after the toaster oven was invented? Nintendo had been around for sixty-eight years at that point! What the actual fuck.

Arms of Blindenmarkt, Austria

Blindenmarkt

Granted ~1522-1529

Blazon: Gules on a pale between two serpents erect argent a dexter wing of the field, surmounted by a triple mount in base proper

The arms were originally granted as shown by Ferdinand I, Holy Roman Emperor sometime between 1522 and 1529. It was re-granted by Maximilian II, Holy Roman Emperor in 1569. The color combination is likely inspired by the Austrian coat of arms, but the origin of the charges is unclear.

Blindenmarkt_grant

The 1569 grant of arms