Arms of Luciana, Spain

Luciana

Granted 1986

Blazon: Per fess I per pale or the letters Y and F crowned sable and argent a cross of Calatrava gules and II azure a bridge of three arches argent over water in base barry wavy of the last and the field

The Y and F stand for Isabella of Castile and Fernando of Aragon, whom the blazon claims were the “true founders” of the town. (In the fifteenth century, the letters Y and I were often used interchangeably.)

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Arms of Bürg-Vöstenhof, Austria

Burg-Vostenhof

Granted 2002

Blazon: Argent on a mount vert a city wall with a gate tower or, masoned and windowed sable, in base water barry wavy of the field and azure

The mount refers to the name of the city (Berg meaning “mountain”). The wall and gate might be an allusion to the second half of the name; Vöstenhof is derived from “festen hof,” an archaic term for “manor house” or “castle.”

Arms of Fuenllana, Spain

Fuenllana

Granted 1987

Blazon: Per pale argent a cross of Santiago gules and azure a castle triple-towered or on a mount in base proper, surmounted in base by a basin argent of water barry wavy of the field and the last; pointé in base or a galero vert, in the fess point an alms bag, in base a croizer and a patriarchal cross in saltire sable

The archbishop’s regalia in base is presumably a reference to St. Thomas of Villanova, who was born in Fuenllana in 1488, and later canonized in 1658.

Arms of Fuencaliente, Spain

Fuencaliente

Granted 1992

Blazon: Per fess I per pale argent a cross of Calatrava gules and chequy of fifteen or and azure, II argent three mounts in base vert, issuant therefrom a jet of steaming water of the field

The name of the town is derived from the Spanish for “hot springs” (“fuentes calientes”), which also refers to the medicinal springs in the area.

Arms of Fernán Caballero, Spain

Fernan Caballero

Granted 1993

Blazon: Per fess I per pale i azure three fleurs-de-lis or and ii per pale 1 gules a castle triple-towered or windowed azure (Castile) and 2 argent a lion rampant purpre, langued gules and crowned or (Leon); II argent issuant from water in base barry azure and the field a holly oak tree proper

The town is supposedly named after Ferrant Cavallero, a warrior in the Reconquista and the first lord of the town. The first records of the town date back to the 12th century during Reconquista.

Arms of El Robledo, Spain

El Robledo

Granted 1985?

Blazon: Per pall reversed I or an oak leaf in pale vert, II argent in chief a cross of Calatrava gules, in base an eagle displayed sable, III azure over water in base barry argent and the field a bridge of three arches proper

The first written record of the town dates from 1214, using the name “Robredum de Migael Diaz.”

Arms of Carrizosa, Spain

Carrizosa

Granted 1976

Blazon: Per fess argent a cross of Santiago gules and or issuant from water in base barry wavy azure and the first seven reeds vert

The cross of Santiago probably refers to the multiple conquests of the town by the Order of Santiago – once in 1186 and again in 1212. The Order was later granted the area around the town in 1243, before it was later given to Pedro Díaz de Monsalve in 1387. The reeds (or carrizos in Spanish) are drawn from the name of the town.