Arms of de Quincy and Galloway

Quincy and Galloway

Arms of Roger de Quincy, Earl of Winchester (1195-1264) and Helen of Galloway

From p81 of Lacies Nobilitie by Sir John Ferne (1586)

Blazon: Per pale baron and femme gules seven mascles 3, 3, and 1 or and argent an escutcheon within a tresseure fleury counter-fleury gules

Helen of Galloway was the daughter of Alan of Galloway, Lord of Galloway and Constable of Scotland. Through their marriage, Roger inherited one-third of the Lordship. He also received the earldom when his mother died in 1235. The arms in the sinister half of the shield allegedly belong to Alan of Galloway, but I cannot corroborate this anywhere. (The tinctures are also somewhat unclear.)

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Arms of John of Scotland

John of Scotland

Earl of Huntingdon 1232-1237 (1207-1237)

From p43 of Lacies Nobilitie by Sir John Ferne (1586)

Blazon: Argent three garbs within a tresseure fleury counter-fleury gules

“For that he was created Earl of Chester by H[enry] III… he assumed these three Garbes: and so in the substance of the charge of his coate, he did imitate the
ensignes of his mother: but in the cullors, and also in the double trassure, he represented the coat of Galloway, being the Armes of his father, and all this in one Sheeld.” (65-66)

(I cannot confirm via other sources that these arms were used by John of Scotland, but honestly, they should’ve been. They’re a nice visual combination of his title and heritage, and garbs gules aren’t very common.)

Arms of Huntingdon and de Blondeville

Huntingdon and de Blondeville

Arms of David of Scotland, Earl of Huntingdon 1214?-1219 (1144-1219) and Matilda de Blondeville (1171-1233)

From p43 of Lacies Nobilitie by Sir John Ferne (1586)

Blazon: Per pale baron and femme; the first argent an escutcheon within a tresseure fleury counter-fleury gules, the second azure three garbs or

As grandson of David I of Scotland and younger brother of William I of Scotland, David was entitled to bear the royal arms with a difference. Judging from Ferne’s depiction, he used two methods of differencing that are more typical of
Scottish heraldry than English: changing the tinctures and using a different charge. The tresseure and use of gules still clearly connects him to the royal family of Scotland. According to Ferne, the nontraditional differencing is due to
his royal blood, since “for the difference being little & in the feeld far off, not easely to be perceaved, should bring a confusion to the people, so that is should be difficult to them, to discerne which is their King.” (63)  He
attributes the specific choice of argent and an escutcheon to “the defense of verity, and sincere truth, signified by the cullor of white.” (65)

Arms of Charles Gordon-Lennox

Earl of March 1791-1860, 5th duke of Richmond, Lennox, and Aubigny, earl of Darnley, baron Settrington, lord Torbolton 1819-1860 (1791-1860)

Blazon: Per quarterly I and IV per quarterly i and iv per quarterly 1 and 4 azure three fleurs-de-lis or (France), 2 and 3 gules three lions passant guardant in pale or, armed and langued azure (England), ii or a lion rampant within a tresseure flory counter-flory gules (Scotland), iii azure a harp or (Ireland), overall in the fess point an escutcheon gules three round buckles or (Aubigny), all within a bordure compony argent a rose gules, seeded, slipped, and leaved proper and gules (from the Lennox arms); II and III per quarterly i azure three boars’ heads couped or (Gordon), ii or three lions’ heads erased gules langued azure (Badenoch), iii or three crescents within a tresseure flory counter-flory gules (Seton), iv azure three cinquefoils or* (Fraser)
*The cinquefoils are usually argent

Arms of Charles Lennox

2nd duke of Richmond and Lennox, duke of Aubigny, earl of March and Darnley, baron Settrington, lord Torbolton 1723-1750 (1701-1750)

Blazon: Per quarterly I and IV per quarterly i and iv azure three fleurs-de-lis or (France), ii and iii gules three lions passant guardant in pale or, armed and langued azure (England), II or a lion rampant within a tresseure flory counter-flory gules (Scotland), III azure a harp or (Ireland), overall in the fess point an escutcheon gules three round buckles or (Aubigny), all within a bordure compony argent a rose gules, seeded, slipped, and leaved proper and gules (from the Lennox arms)

Arms of Charles Lennox

1st duke of Richmond and Lennox, earl of March and Darnley, baron Settrington, lord Torbolton 1675-1723, duke of Aubigny 1684-1723 simultaneously with his mother Louise Renée de Penancoët de Keroualle (1672-1723)

Blazon: Per quarterly I and IV per quarterly i and iv azure three fleurs-de-lis or (France), ii and iii gules three lions passant guardant in pale or, armed and langued azure (England), II or a lion rampant within a tresseure flory counter-flory gules (Scotland), III azure a harp or (Ireland), all within a bordure compony argent a rose gules, seeded, slipped, and leaved proper and gules (from the Lennox arms)

Arms of George Boleyn, Viscount Rochford

Arms of George Boleyn, Viscount Rochford (1504-1536)

Blazon: Per quarterly; I gules on a bend between six cross crosslets fitchy argent, an escutcheon or, within a tresseure flory counter-flory a demi-lion rampant pierced in the mouth with an arrow of the first (Howard); II gules three lions passant guardant in pale or, armed and langued azure, a label of three points argent (Duchy of Lancaster); III chequy or and azure (Warren); IV gules a lion rampant or (Fitzalan); overall in the fess point an escutcheon crowned proper, argent a chevron between three molets of six points sable (possibly for his wife, Jane Parker, daughter of the 10th Baron Morley)