Arms of the borough of Amber Valley

Amber Valley

Derbyshire, England

Granted 1989

Blazon: Vert a pale wavy or within a bordure argent charged with five horseshoes sable, on a chief of the second between two lozenges a cresset sable fired proper

Crest: On a wreath of the colors the battlements of a tower proper issuant therefrom between two croizers or an oak tree also proper fructed and ensigned by a crown of fleurs-de-lis of the first

Supporters: On the dexter a unicorn argent armed and crined or gorged with a collar pendant therefrom a cross flory gules; on the sinister a leopard proper gorged with a collar gules pendant therefrom a fleur-de-lis or

Mantling: Vert lined or

Motto: Per laborem progredimur (By hard work we progress)

The pale wavy evidently represents the river Amber, while the lozenges and cresset symbolize the coal and iron industries. The horseshoes on the bordure are taken from (one of the versions of) the arms of the Ferrers family.

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Arms of Unterkirnach, Germany

Unterkirnach

In use since at least 1989

Blazon: Argent on three mounts in base vert as many towers gules

The town probably originated as a possession of the house of Roggenbach, though it passed to the monastery of St. Georgen by papal decree in 1187.

Arms of the borough of Tower Hamlets, London, England

Tower Hamlets

Granted 1965

Blazon: Argent on a base wavy azure charged with two bars wavy of the field a lymphad sail furled sable pennon and flags flying gules, on a chief of the second between a pair of fire tongs and a weaver’s shuttle a pale of the first charged with a sprig of mulberry fructed proper

Crest: On a wreath of the colors in front of a representation of the White Tower of the Tower of London proper two anchors in saltire or

Supporters: On the dexter side a sea-horse, on the sinister side a talbot, all proper

Mantling: Azure lined argent

Motto: From great things to greater

Most of the elements in this achievement are drawn from the arms of the borough of Stepney, which was incorporated into Tower Hamlets in 1965. The fire tongs are the symbol of St. Dunstan, who held the Manor of Stepney when he was Bishop of London.

Arms of Bürg-Vöstenhof, Austria

Burg-Vostenhof

Granted 2002

Blazon: Argent on a mount vert a city wall with a gate tower or, masoned and windowed sable, in base water barry wavy of the field and azure

The mount refers to the name of the city (Berg meaning “mountain”). The wall and gate might be an allusion to the second half of the name; Vöstenhof is derived from “festen hof,” an archaic term for “manor house” or “castle.”

Arms of Hüfingen, Germany

Hufingen

In use since the mid-1600s

Blazon: Azure a tower double-towered argent

It seems evident that the device on these arms is intended to be a representation of a particular tower, but I cannot find which one. It is possible that it depicts a castle built under the rule of the Schellenberger family, which was demolished by the Fürstenbergs in 1705, but this is purely speculation.

Arms of Bruck an der Leitha, Austria

Bruck an der Leitha

In use since 2010

Blazon: Or a double-headed eagle displayed sable, armed of the field, langued and nimbed gules, charged on the breast with an escutcheon of the last a city wall with portcullis and three towers, the center with a pointed roof or

The escutcheon in the above arms seems to have been in use for a fairly long time (at least since 1932). The eagle seems to have come into use around 2010, though it is unclear why.

Arms of Arenas de San Juan, Spain

Arenas de San Juan

In use since at least 1989

Blazon: Per fess sable charged with a bar wavy azure, I per pale gules a tower or windowed of the second and of the third a Maltese cross argent, II of the second a wall of four towers of the fourth windowed and masoned of the first

The wall in the lower half of the arms presumably represents the local Roman observation tower. The town’s name derives from the sandy terrain (arenales) and its history with the Order of St. John, which is likely the source of the Maltese cross.