Arms of Diersbach, Austria

Diersbach

Granted 1984

Blazon: Gules on a fess in chief wavy argent a sword in fess, point to the sinister proper, hilted of the field; on a mount in base rayonné or a serpent glissant reguardant sable crowned of the first

The fess wavy is a canting reference to the “Bach” part of the name (meaning river or stream), and the sword is the symbol of St. Martin, the village’s patron saint. The snake is a reference to a local legend of a treasure hidden in the nearby castle Waldeck and guarded by crowned serpents.

Advertisements

Arms of Pedro Muñoz, Spain

Pedro Munoz

In use since at least 1984

Blazon: Per quarterly I sable a cross of Santiago gules, II vert a castle triple-towered argent, windowed sable, III gules a crown or, IV azure two clasped hands, in chief a baton and sword in saltire argent

The base two quarters are both references to the previous arms, which incorporated both the crown of Charles V, Holy Roman Emperor, and the sword and baton as symbols of civil and military authority.

Arms of the borough of Hounslow, London, England

Hounslow

Granted 1964

Blazon: Per fess azure and gules on a fess wavy between two wings conjoined in base argent surmounted by a sword erect or, in base a lion rampant guardant per fess of the fourth and third, a barrulet wavy of the first

Crest: On a wreath of the colors upon ferns proper a tablot passant sable supporting over the shoulder a post horn or

Supporters: Two griffins or gorged with collars gemel wavy azure charged on the wings with as many seaxes

Mantling: Azure lined argent

Motto: Juncti progrediamur (Let us go forward together)

The wings and sword represent London Airport and the aircraft industry. The lion is from the arms of Hounslow Priory. The fess and barrulet(s) are from the  Borough of Brentford and Chiswick, representing the rivers Brent and Thames

The blazon specifies one barrulet, but this depiction shows two. Either the number of the barrulets or the descriptor is off; it could be a barrulet gemel, which would be indicated by the collars on the supporters.

Arms of the borough of Croyden

Croyden

London, England

Granted 1965

Blazon: Argent on a cross flory sable between in chief dexter two swords in saltire and sinister two keys in saltire, both azure and gules, five bezants

Crest: On a mural crown or a fountain between a branch of oak leaved and fructed and a branch of beech slipped proper

Supporters: On the dexter a lion sable and on the sinister a horse argent each with a cross formy fitchy pendant from a collar counterchanged

Mantling: Sable lined argent

Motto: Ad summa nitamur (Let us strive for perfection)

The cross flory comes from the arms of John Whitgift, Archbishop of Canterbury, by way of the County Borough of Croyden. The keys and swords refer to the Abbey of St. Peter and St. Paul. The fountain symbolizes the source of the River Wandle, and the white horse is from the arms of the Earls of Surrey.

Many other ensigns also are allowed to a king, for the setting forth of his majesty, and to the declaration of his function, as, a Mound or ball of gold, with the cross upon it [orb], to signify, that the religion and faith of Christ ought to be reverenced throughout all his dominions. The scepter also in the one hand signefieth Justice, and the sword in the other teacheth vengeance.

– From The Blazon of Gentrie by Sir John Ferne (1586), p144

Arms of Argamasilla de Alba, Spain

Argamasilla de Alba

Granted 1974

Blazon: Per fess I per pale gules a Maltese cross argent and chequy of fifteen azure and the second, II of the third a sword in bend and a spear in bend sinister, points to the chief, surmounted by “Mambrino’s helmet,” all of the second.

This depiction is not particularly accurate; the original blazon specifies that the lower half of the shield should be azure, with argent charges. Inexplicably, the official site of the city uses a very similar depiction as that seen here.

The final charge is a reference to an incident in the Cervantes novel Don Quixote de la Mancha. The titular character sees a barber caught in the rain and wearing a basin as an impromptu hat, and declares this basin to be the fabled helmet of the legendary Moorish king Mambrino, which is supposed to make the wearer invulnerable. The novel also makes reference to the town, and a local legend holds (without much proof) that Cervantes was once imprisoned in a cave near the town.

Arms of the borough of Brent

Brent

Granted 1965

Blazon: Per chevron wavy argent gules and vert, in dexter chief an orb ensigned with a cross crosslet or, in sinister chief two swords in saltire proper, points in chief, in base as many seaxes in saltire, points in chief of the last enfiled with a Saxon crown of the fourth

Crest: Within a Saxon crown or on a mount vert a lion statant of the first charged on the shoulder with a cinquefoil gules

Supporters: On the dexter a lion or supporting a staff gules with a banner vert charged with a balance of the first; on the sinister a dragon azure supporting a staff of the third with a banner of the second charged with three lilies argent

Mantling: Gules lined argent

Motto: Forward Together

Compartment*: A grassy mound divided by water argent charged with a pale wavy azure

This achievement is largely a combination of the arms of the former boroughs of Wembley and Willesden. The former contributed the seaxes, the Saxon crown, and the lions, while the latter contributed the orb, the swords (both symbols of King Athelstan), the cinquefoil, and the dragon.

*Compartments are usually left to the discretion of the artist, not specified in the blazon.