Arms of Inzigkofen, Germany

Inzigkofen

In use since at least 2009

Blazon: Per fess argent a boar’s head erased sable, armed or, langued gules and of the last a stag statant of the third

The name of the town evolved over several centuries from Untzkoven or Ünzkowen to its current spelling. It may be derived from a farm named after someone named “Unzo,” but the ultimate origin is unclear.

Advertisements

Arms of Herbertingen, Germany

Herbertingen

Granted 1682

Blazon: Azure on a triple mount in base proper a stag salient or bearing in the mouth an arrow sable fletched gules and argent

The first written reference to the village dates back to 854, when Louis the German awarded the area to the diocese of Constance.

Arms of Derbyshire County, England

Derbyshire

Granted 1937

Blazon: Or a rose gules surmounted by another argent, both barbed and seeded proper, on a chief sable three stags’ heads caboshed of the third

Crest: Issuant from a mural crown or a dragon wings elevated and addorsed sable holding in the dexter claw a pick of the first and collared argent

Supporters: On the dexter a stag and on the sinister a ram, both proper and gorged with a chain or pendant therefrom a rose gules surmounted by another argent, barbed and seeded also proper

Mantling: Gules lined or

Motto: Bene consulendo (By good counsel)

The double rose is referred to as the Tudor rose; Henry VII adopted it as a badge to symbolize the union of the houses of Lancaster (whose symbol was a red rose) and York (the white rose). The county previously used the Tudor rose as an unofficial device. The stag refers to the first local fort built by Danish invaders, which was named Derby after the number of deer in the region, and eventually gave its name to the county.

Arms of the Royal Borough of Kingston upon Thames

Kingston upon Thames

London, England

Granted 1966

Blazon: Azure three salmon naiant in pale argent finned and tailed gules

Crest: On a wreath of the colors issuant from a wreath of bay leaves vert banded or a demi-stag proper gorged with a crown of or pendant therefrom an escutcheon ermine on a chevron vert between two chevronels the chief per pale azure and gules, the base per pale gules and azure, a cross paté or, holding between the forelegs a fountain

Supporters: Two stags proper gorged with a ribbon argent pendant therefrom an escutcheon azure issuant from the base an elm tree proper in front of a sun rising or and resting the interior hind hoof on a charred woodstock proper

Compartment*: A grassy mount proper supported by a fillet wavy pre fess wavy argent and azure

Mantling: Azure lined argent

The arms are derived from the historical arms of the borough, recorded as far back as 1572; the three salmon refer to three fisheries mentioned in the Domesday Book. The escutcheon on the crest bears the arms of the Borough of Malden and Coombe, and the supporters’ escutcheons show the arms of the Borough of Surbiton.

*Compartments are usually left to the discretion of the artist, not specified in the blazon.

Arms of the borough of Barnet, London, England

Barnet

Granted 1965

Blazon: Azure on a mount in base a Paschal lamb proper; on a chief per pale argent and gules a Saxon crown or between two roses counterchanged barbed and seeded proper

Crest: On a wreath of the colors a two-bladed airscrew in pale winged or surmounted by two swords in saltire points upwards proper

Supporters: On the dexter a lion and on the sinister a stag argent charged on the shoulder with a cross potent quadrate gules

Mantling: Azure lined argent

Motto: Unitas efficit ministerium (Unity accomplishes service)

The borough was formed from a combination of other boroughs, most of which are represented in the achievement. The Paschal lamb and the airscrew are from Hendon; the supporters are from Finchley; the crosses potent quadrate are from Friern Barnet. The red and white roses featured in the arms of both Barnet and East Barnet as a reference to the Battle of Barnet from the Wars of the Roses.

There is so much going on here, and I’m not sure any of it is good. Setting aside the fact that it’s basically impossible to make these arms work within the law of tinctures and the completely unnecessary compartment, my biggest complaint has to be the crest. First, that does NOT look like a propeller. I only figured out it’s supposed to be a two-bladed propeller seen from the front from the blazon. That’s not good. Secondly, it’s a fucking propeller. It’s already an allusion to aviation. You don’t need to put fucking wings on it. Third, I’m going to borrow Fox-Davies’ complaint about more modern crests: they were originally intended to be worn on top of a helmet. How the fuck are you supposed to balance that thing on your head? Would it even be identifiable from a distance? This is such a trainwreck, even the counterchanged reference to the Wars of the Roses isn’t enough to save it.

Arms of Braunstone Town Council, England

Braunstone

Granted 1976

Blazon: Gules on a fess wavy azure fimbriated or between in chief a maunch argent between two bezants and in base a cross paté argent, two shovellers close of the last

Crest: On a wreath argent and gules a stag statant resting its dexter leg on a mound of stones, all proper

Mantling: Gules lined argent

Motto: Spectemur agendo (Let us be judged by our actions)