Arms of Alcázar del Rey, Spain

Alcazar del Rey

Granted 2001

Blazon: Per pale azure a castle triple-towered or windowed gules and of the second, a crescent decrescent argent and a lion rampant of the second

The representation of the lion and the crescent moon don’t seem consistent; some depictions, as here, have the lion almost within the curve of the moon, and in others, it looks more like the lion is supporting the moon with its front paws. The dexter half of the shield is apparently a canting element, since alcázar is Spanish for a fortified castle. The sinister half replicates the arms of Huete, to which the town previously belonged. Allegedly, the lion represents the victory of the Christians over the Muslims (represented by the crescent) in the Reconquista, but I don’t have a good source for that theory.

Arms of Alcantud, Spain

Alcantud

Granted 2003

Blazon: Gules on a bend sinister wavy argent between in chief a bridge of two arches and in base a castle triple-towered or two bendlets sinister wavy azure

It seems likely the bridge is a representation of a specific bridge in the area, but I can’t find any proof of this (or images of local bridges). It does sound like there are ancient Roman baths in the area, so that could be the source of the bendlets, but again, this is only speculation.

Arms of Alcalá de la Vega, Spain

Alcala de la Vega

In use since at least 2010

Blazon: Gules a tower or within a bordure azure charged with four trees proper; pointé in base argent a cross paté of the first

The tower is probably a representation of the ruins of an Arab castle, formerly called al-Qala. It’s old enough that we don’t know exactly when it was built, but it’s referenced in an 872 document. The same document also notes that the area is densely wooded with stone pine trees that were used for construction and shipbuilding; I’d guess that’s why the arms include trees. The cross gules on a point argent seems like it could be a reference to the 68 or so years that the town spent under direct control of the Templars.

Arms of La Alberca de Záncara, Spain

La Alberca de Záncara

Granted 1992

Blazon: Or issuant from a base vert a tree, surmounted by a stone reservoir proper

I don’t have a lot of information about these arms, but I’m also not sure there’s much to say. The reservoir or pool (alberca) is a canting element; the town has borne this name since its origins as an Arab settlement. The Záncara is a local river, and I’m afraid that’s all I’ve got.

Albalate de las Nogueras, Spain

Albalate de las Nogueras

Granted 2007

Blazon: Per fess I per pale gules a tower or windowed azure and of the last a bridge of three arches argent; II of the last two walnut trees issuant from a base vert

I’m afraid information about this town is pretty thin on the ground, never mind the arms, so I’m left with speculation. I have to assume the bridge is a representation of a specific bridge in the area, particularly since the original blazon specifies a “medieval” bridge. The tower might also represent a specific landmark, though it could also be a visual reference to the arms of Castile. Finally, I’m pretty sure the walnut trees, or árboles nogales, are a canting element.

Arms of Alarcón, Spain

Alarcon

Granted 1991

Blazon: Gules a castle double-towered or windowed azure, in dexter chief a crescent and sinister chief a molet of eight points argent

Presumably, the castle in the arms is a reference to the castle of Alarcón. It was already an impressive fortification when the forces of Alfonso VIII captured it in 1184. By the 1700s, it was pretty run down, but it managed to survive, and was declared a site of cultural interest in 1992. There’s a legend about the sister of an ancient lord and a suitor she rejected; he schemed to murder her and her brother, but when he arrived at the castle in disguise, he was discovered and killed. The servants mixed his blood into the mortar for some repairs they were doing on the castle, which is allegedly why there are black and red spots in the mortar.

Arms of El Acebrón, Spain

El Acebron

Granted 2010

Blazon: Per quarterly, I or a holly branch proper fructed gules; II gules issuant from three bars wavy in base argent a castle proper between two serpents’ heads or respectant issuant from the sides of the shield; III vert on a bridge over water barry wavy in base argent and azure, two towers of the second, the dexter flying a flag of the last a saltire gules and the sinister supporting a ladder of the same; IV argent a cross of Santiago gules; overall in the fess point an escutcheon argent seven crowns 2, 2, 2, and 1 proper

The first quarter is evidently canting, acebo meaning “holly” in Spanish. The second and third quarters are apparently connected to the first lord of the town, Gaspar Ramírez de Vargas. I’m not entirely clear on whether they’re his family arms, or connected to him in some other way. (It’s unclear whether the snakes are related to The Mystery of the Snake Cauldrons, but probably not.) The seven crowns in the escutcheon are a reference to a mythical medieval battle that ostensibly took place at the nearby castle of Sicuendes, where seven counts were killed.