Arms of Terrinches, Spain

Terrinches
Granted 1988

Blazon: Per pale argent a cross of Santiago gules and azure a tower of the first

These may partly be canting arms, as “Terrinches” may be derived from “Torreblanca,” or “white tower.” Alternatively, the sinister half of the arms may be a reference to the town’s defensive importance during the Reconquista. The dexter half reflects the town’s previous ownership by the Order of Santiago.

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Arms of Solana del Pino, Spain

Solana del Pino
Granted 1985

Blazon: Or issuant from a base a stone pine tree proper between a stag and a mountain goat statant respectant sable, in chief a cross of Calatrava gules

The name and arms are a reference to the abundance of stone pines in the area, which is unusual for the climate.

Arms of Socuéllamos, Spain

Socuellamos
Granted 1955

Blazon: Per pale vert a tower or windowed azure and of the last a cross of Santiago gules fimbriated argent, pointé in base of the fourth a bunch of grapes of the second slipped of the first

The tower is a reference to Torre de Vejezate, a local abandoned town. The cross of Santiago reflects the fact that the land previously belonged to the Order of Santiago, and the grapes refer to the traditional industry of winemaking.

Arms of Santa Cruz de Mudela, Spain

Santa Cruz de Mudela
In use since at least 2013

Blazon: Per fess gules a castle triple-towered or windowed azure and sable two bars argent and a pale counterchanged within a bordure gules charged with eight saltires couped or

According to legend, the town’s name comes from an incident in the early thirteenth century, where a man accused another of killing his father. When the former came to kill the latter, he saw a cross in the air above his head and dropped the sword.

Arms of San Lorenzo de Calatrava, Spain

San Lorenzo de Calatrava
Granted 1991

Blazon: Per fess argent a cross of Calatrava gules and or a grill fesswise sable, in base a palm branch embowed proper

The grill is a symbol of St. Lawrence, the patron saint of the town, who was roasted to death. The first records of the town date back to 1588, when a group of peasants told King Felipe II that they were unable to attend Mass because they lived too far from a church.

Arms of San Carlos del Valle, Spain

San Carlos del Valle
Granted 1995

Blazon: Per pale azure a representation of the local church of Christ of the Valley argent and of the last a cross of Santiago gules, pointé in base or a bunch of grapes slipped and leaved vert

The characteristic church featured on the arms was built in the sixteenth century on the site of the former hermitage of St. Helena, where (according to legend) Christ appeared in the form of a strange traveler.