Arms of Riópar, Spain

Riopar

Granted 1988

Blazon: Per fess I per pale two cauldrons in pale chequy or and sable, each containing twelve serpents, eight facing the exterior and four facing the interior proper and chequy of nine argent a lion rampant gules (León) and gules a castle triple-towered or windowed azure (Castile), II gules on water in base barry wavy argent and azure a castle triple-towered or windowed azure, surmounted by a four-spoked cog-wheel sable

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Arms of Bienservida, Spain

Bienservida

In use since at least 1991

Blazon: Per fess I per pale gules two cauldrons in pale chequy or and sable, each containing twelve serpents, eight facing the exterior and four facing the interior proper and chequy of nine argent a lion rampant gules (León) and gules a castle triple-towered or windowed azure (Castile)*; II argent a lion rampant bearing in its forepaws a man’s head couped and bearded gules

*The blazon specifies that the second, fourth, sixth, and eighth quarters contain Castile; I believe the blank eighth quarter in this rendition is an artist’s error.

Arms of Gabriel de Rochechouart

Rochechouart

Marquis, later duke of Mortemart 1650-1675 (1600-1675)
Blazon: Party of eight I gules a crescent vair (Maurre), II azure between three fleurs-de-lis or a bendlet couped gules (Bourbon), III gules nine mascles 3, 3, and 3 or (Rohan), IV barry of ten argent and azure three chevronels gules (Rochefoucault), V argent a serpent nowed azure and devouring a child gules (Milan), VI gules a chain in saltire, cross, and orle or, charged with a center point vert (Navarre), VII gules a pale vair (Escars), VIII ermine (Bretagne); overall an escutcheon barry nebuly of six argent and gules (Rochechouart)

To [astronomers] would be applied for coat-armor a blue field, and in the same, some of the heavenly bodies, as Planets or Stars, or some of those instruments, wherewith they take their zeniths, elevations, longitudes, etc. also a Serpent biting her tail etc.

– From The Blazon of Gentrie by Sir John Ferne (1586), p50

Most congruent armory it is for [physicians] to bear Serpents, as assigned of their first patron, Aesculapius, worshipped in the form of a Serpent.

– From The Blazon of Gentrie by Sir John Ferne (1586), p45