Arms of France ancien

France ancien

In use from at least 1211 until 1376

Blazon: Azure semé de lis or

According to legend, the former (ancien) arms of France originated when Clovis I, first king of the Franks, was baptized. He adopted the lily as his new emblem to symbolize the purity of the Virgin Mary and his new faith. However, despite this legend and its name, the fleur-de-lis (literally, lily flower) doesn’t actually look very much like a lily. Most credible authorities, including Boutell, Dalloway, and numerous French heralds, assert that the depiction is intended as some form of flower, probably an iris, that was later confused with a lily. However, there is a poorly-supported but persistent theory that it is actually a stylized spearhead. While this would explain the bizarre figure of leopard’s heads jessant-de-lis, there isn’t much else to recommend it.

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Arms of Brodingberg, Austria

Brodingberg

Granted 1990

Blazon: Azure semé of hazelnuts a horse salient or

The hazelnuts are derived from the arms of the former municipality of Haselbach (or “Hazel Creek”), while the horse refers to the town’s former business of making deliveries by horse. The tinctures are taken from the arms of the abbey of Rein, who controlled the area after the Dukes of Styria.

Arms of François de Harlay de Champvalon

Champvalon

Archbisop of Rouen 1651-1671, Archbishop of Paris 1671-1695, duke of Saint-Cloud 1674-1695 (1625-1695)

Blazon: Party of eight, I or a fess chequy gules and argent (La Marck), II azure an escutcheon* argent within an orle or and eight crosses couped of the second also in orle (Brézé), III argent three bars gules (Croÿ), IV azure three fleurs-de-lis or surmounted by a baton in bend gules (Bourbon), V azure semé of cross crosslets fitchy or a lion rampant argent (Sarrebruck), VI paly of six or and gules (Amboise), VII per quarterly i and iv lozengy in bend argent and azure (Bavaria), ii and iii sable a lion rampant crowned or, armed and langued gules (Brabant), VIII azure six plates in pile and a chief or (Poitiers-Valentinois); overall in the fess point an escutcheon argent two palets sable (Harlay)

*This charge seems to be depicted as a pale couped here instead of the escutcheon specified in the blazon.

Arms of Charles François de Lorraine

Duke of Joyeuse 1688-1702, prince of Commercy (1661-1702)

Blazon: Party of eight, I barry of eight gules and argent (Hungary ancien), II azure semé des lis or, a label of three points gules (Naples), III argent a cross paté between four crosses or (Jerusalem), IV or four palets gules (Aragon), V azure semé des lis or within a bordure gules (Anjou), VI azure a lion counter-rampant or crowned gules (Gueldre), VII a lion rampant sable, armed and langued gules (Juliers), VIII azure semé des cross crosslets fitchy, two fish hauriant addorsed or (Bar), overall a label of three points gules, in the fess point an escutcheon or on a bend gules three alerions argent (Lorraine), all within a bordure gules charged with eight bezants