Arms of Sankt Georgen im Schwarzwald, Germany

Sankt Georgen

Granted 1958; in use since 1900

Blazon: Gules a representation of St. George proper armored or, mounted on a horse saliant argent, caprisoned of the second, slaying a dragon in crescent vert

The earliest depictions of the municipal arms show the arms of Baden (or a bend gules) in the chief, with the St. George and the Dragon motif in base. The Baden arms were dropped after Sankt Georgen became a city in 1891.

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Arms of Schonach im Schwarzwald, Germany

Schonach im Schwarzwald

In use since at least 1989

Blazon: Argent issuant from a crescent or a figure of the Virgin proper, habited azure, mantled gules, crined, crowned, nimbed, and bearing in the dexter hand a staff of the second and in the sinister the Christ Child also proper, habited of the third, crined, nimbed, and bearing an orb of the second

The use of the Virgin Mary in the municipal arms is likely a reference to the town’s staunch Catholicism, even post-Reformation.

Arms of Hinojosas de Calatrava, Spain

Hinojosas de Calatrava

In use since at least 2011

Blazon: Argent in dexter a cross of Calatrava gules, in sinister two branches of fennel in saltire proper; pointé in base or a representation of St. Bernard of Clairvaux nimbed and bearing in the dexter hand a shepherd’s crook and in the sinister an open book also proper, robed gules

Like so many other municipalities in the region, Hinojosas de Calatrava belonged to the Order of Calatrava after Reconquista. As well as the symbol of the Order, the arms also include a canting element (“hinojo” meaning “fennel” in Spanish) and a representation of the patron saint of the town.

Arms of Wisbech Town Council, England

Wisbech

Granted 1929

Blazon: Azure representations of St. Peter and St. Paul standing within a double canopy or

Crest: On a wreath of the colors a three-masted ship in full sail or, sails azure, the center charged with two keys in saltire and the others with a castle of the first

Mantling: Azure lined or