Arms of Derbyshire County, England

Derbyshire

Granted 1937

Blazon: Or a rose gules surmounted by another argent, both barbed and seeded proper, on a chief sable three stags’ heads caboshed of the third

Crest: Issuant from a mural crown or a dragon wings elevated and addorsed sable holding in the dexter claw a pick of the first and collared argent

Supporters: On the dexter a stag and on the sinister a ram, both proper and gorged with a chain or pendant therefrom a rose gules surmounted by another argent, barbed and seeded also proper

Mantling: Gules lined or

Motto: Bene consulendo (By good counsel)

The double rose is referred to as the Tudor rose; Henry VII adopted it as a badge to symbolize the union of the houses of Lancaster (whose symbol was a red rose) and York (the white rose). The county previously used the Tudor rose as an unofficial device. The stag refers to the first local fort built by Danish invaders, which was named Derby after the number of deer in the region, and eventually gave its name to the county.

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Arms of Tuningen, Germany

Tuningen

In use since at least 1989

Blazon: Argent a bend raguly sable sprouting two roses gules seeded or leaved vert

The town was first mentioned by name in 797 as part of a donation to the monastery of St. Gallus.

Arms of Wolpertshausen, Germany

Wolpertshausen

Granted 1955

Blazon: Gules two warhammers addorsed argent, on a chief of the second three roses of the field

The hammers are from the arms of the Lords of Reinsberg, and the roses are derived from the arms of the Lords of Bilriet. The former owned a town that was later incorporated into Wolpertshausen, while the latter owned the original municipality.

Arms of Brunnenthal, Austria

Brunnenthal

Granted 1983

Blazon: Argent a rose gules slipped and seeded or within an annulet of the last and a base with a Jochschnitt azure

The Jochschnitt (or “yoke cut”) is a charge used exclusively in Germanic heraldry that refers to a semi-circular incision towards the base of the shield. Charges may have multiple Jochschnitts. The base is intended to represent the local spa, which was already well-known in the 17th century. The rose is the symbol of St. Mary, patron saint of the town.

Arms of Rosengarten, Germany

Rosengarten

In use since at least 1979

Blazon: Argent a chief dancetty and a rose gules, seeded or

The rose is clearly a canting reference to the city’s name, and the chief dancetty is a reference to the arms of Franconia (usually per fess dancetty gules and argent). The municipal website makes the somewhat dubious claim that the dancetty division line can be read as a garden fence, thus making the arms entirely canting.

Arms of the borough of Barnet, London, England

Barnet

Granted 1965

Blazon: Azure on a mount in base a Paschal lamb proper; on a chief per pale argent and gules a Saxon crown or between two roses counterchanged barbed and seeded proper

Crest: On a wreath of the colors a two-bladed airscrew in pale winged or surmounted by two swords in saltire points upwards proper

Supporters: On the dexter a lion and on the sinister a stag argent charged on the shoulder with a cross potent quadrate gules

Mantling: Azure lined argent

Motto: Unitas efficit ministerium (Unity accomplishes service)

The borough was formed from a combination of other boroughs, most of which are represented in the achievement. The Paschal lamb and the airscrew are from Hendon; the supporters are from Finchley; the crosses potent quadrate are from Friern Barnet. The red and white roses featured in the arms of both Barnet and East Barnet as a reference to the Battle of Barnet from the Wars of the Roses.

There is so much going on here, and I’m not sure any of it is good. Setting aside the fact that it’s basically impossible to make these arms work within the law of tinctures and the completely unnecessary compartment, my biggest complaint has to be the crest. First, that does NOT look like a propeller. I only figured out it’s supposed to be a two-bladed propeller seen from the front from the blazon. That’s not good. Secondly, it’s a fucking propeller. It’s already an allusion to aviation. You don’t need to put fucking wings on it. Third, I’m going to borrow Fox-Davies’ complaint about more modern crests: they were originally intended to be worn on top of a helmet. How the fuck are you supposed to balance that thing on your head? Would it even be identifiable from a distance? This is such a trainwreck, even the counterchanged reference to the Wars of the Roses isn’t enough to save it.