Arms of Socuéllamos, Spain

Socuellamos
Granted 1955

Blazon: Per pale vert a tower or windowed azure and of the last a cross of Santiago gules fimbriated argent, pointé in base of the fourth a bunch of grapes of the second slipped of the first

The tower is a reference to Torre de Vejezate, a local abandoned town. The cross of Santiago reflects the fact that the land previously belonged to the Order of Santiago, and the grapes refer to the traditional industry of winemaking.

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Arms of San Carlos del Valle, Spain

San Carlos del Valle
Granted 1995

Blazon: Per pale azure a representation of the local church of Christ of the Valley argent and of the last a cross of Santiago gules, pointé in base or a bunch of grapes slipped and leaved vert

The characteristic church featured on the arms was built in the sixteenth century on the site of the former hermitage of St. Helena, where (according to legend) Christ appeared in the form of a strange traveler.

Arms of Ruidera, Spain

ALT
Granted 1998

Blazon: Per pale argent a pall gules and of the last, a Maltese cross of the first, pointé in base barry wavy of the first and azure

Although Ruidera fell into the territory of the Order of Santiago (per a 1237 treaty), it ultimately ended up as the property of the Order of St. John in 1783, which is probably the source for the Maltese cross. There are also many lagoons and wetlands in the area under national protection, which may be the source of the barry wavy point.

Arms of Fuenllana, Spain

Fuenllana

Granted 1987

Blazon: Per pale argent a cross of Santiago gules and azure a castle triple-towered or on a mount in base proper, surmounted in base by a basin argent of water barry wavy of the field and the last; pointé in base or a galero vert, in the fess point an alms bag, in base a croizer and a patriarchal cross in saltire sable

The archbishop’s regalia in base is presumably a reference to St. Thomas of Villanova, who was born in Fuenllana in 1488, and later canonized in 1658.

Arms of Fontanarejo, Spain

Fontanarejo

In use since at least 2008

Blazon: Per pale vert two mounts in base argent and of the last a tree of the first surmounted in base by a boar statant sable; pointé in base gules a molet of six points of the second

While the area has probably been occupied since the Iron Age, Fontanarejo did not formally become a town until the mid-fifteenth century.