Pheons, or arrow heads, which Skinner derives from the Saxon floene, are more common than the whole arrow. They were made of fine steel, barbed and scalloped on the inside, to increase the difficulty of extraction, and were furnished by a tenant to his chief in acknowledgement of petit serjeanty.

– From Inquiries into the Origin and Progress of the Science of Heraldry in England by James Dallaway, p463 (1793)

Military objects used as heraldic charges

 From Inquiries into the Origin and Process of the Science of Heraldry in England by James Dallaway, p454

Left to right (click on the names for more examples of each charge):

The escarbuncle. While its origin is not certain, it is believed to have been a way of reinforcing wooden shields. It is probably best known as the badge of Henry II of England, taken from the ancient arms of the French region of Anjou.

The helmet, while most often seen as a component of complete achievements, does occasionally appear by itself as a charge.

The pheon was an ancient dart head. Although its shape and function are similar to the arrowhead, the pheon is barbed.

Procession of heralds at the funeral of Sir Philip Sidney, 1587

dalloway292 p2.42

 

From Inquiries into the Origin and Process of the Science of Heraldry in England by James Dallaway, p292

Copied from a roll by Thomas [?]

From left to right: William Segar as Portcullis, Humphrey Hales as York Herald, Nicholas Paddy as Rouge Dragon, Richard Lee as Richmond, Robert Glover as Somerset, Robert Cooke as Clarenceux King of Arms

Note the recurrence of the pheon (the charge on the Sidney coat of arms) and the full arms borne by Sir Philip on Glover’s banner.