Arms of Villanueva de los Infantes, Spain

Villanueva de los Infantes

Granted 1421

Blazon: Argent a cross of Santiago gules between in bend two escutcheons or four palets of the second, and in bend sinister a lion rampant of the last and a castle triple-towered of the third windowed azure

There might be a better way to describe the positioning of the charges, but I’m not entirely sure what that would be. I’m hesitant to say they’re laid out in saltire, since most of them are different, and describing the individual position of each charge (eg. in dexter chief, in sinister chief, etc.) seems excessive. I ended up going with the bends because the charges seem to naturally fall into two groups – the lion and castle of Léon and Castile, and the shields of Aragon for Enrique and Alfonso, Infantes of Aragon.

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Arms of Occitanie, France

Occitanie

Granted 2017

Blazon: Gules a cross of Toulouse or; the fourth quarter of the last, four palets of the first

This blazon was formerly, if unofficially, used by Languedoc-Roussillon, but the combination was obvious, given that Midi-Pyrénées used gules a cross of Toulouse or. I accept that I am slightly biased by both the shading in this particular depiction (definitely not a part of traditional blazon, but it sure does add a nice touch) and my fond memories of the region, but damn. This is Good. You’ve got your cross of Toulouse, and your palets from Aragon by way of Catalonia, combined into something that’s modern, visually distinctive, and obviously derived from something much older.

(NB: Yes, I know I skipped Grand Est. They don’t formally have arms yet, but let me express my hope that they’re using this time to design something more visually appealing than the proposed flag, holy shit. That is too many bends, y’all. Pick one.)

Arms of Nouvelle-Aquitaine, France

Nouvelle-Aquitaine

Granted 2016

Blazon: Argent in dexter three palets wavy azure, in sinister a lion rampant gules

Another new coat of arms for the administrative regions! Personally, I prefer the former arms of Aquitaine (gules a lion passant guardant or, armed and langued azure), and Limousin was pretty sharp, too (ermine a bordure gules), but design-wise, this is pretty good. In terms of the charges selected… well, I suppose I understand the reasoning. The palets are probably intended to represent the rivers that run to the Atlantic, much like the lion’s mane in the new logo. They also could be a canting charge, if you subscribe to the etymology that has “Aquitaine” derived from the Latin for “water.” I feel that it’s worth mentioning the competing theory – that it’s actually named after the pre-Roman tribe of the Ausci.

The lion has been used for Aquitaine since at least the twelfth century, and possibly earlier, so it isn’t like they could leave it out. And I guess if we’re going to get picky about the law of tincture, and we really want those palets wavy, then fine, gules works. There are several cities in the region that use a lion gules, so it’s not like it’s coming from nowhere. (I really did like the former arms, though.)

Arms of Dietmanns, Austria

Dietmanns
In use since at least 1965

Blazon: Gules four palets argent and a chief of the last chequy of the field, overall issuant from a mount in base a pine tree proper surmounted by a baton in bend sinister, interwoven with the palets or

The town has been in existence since 1496, with official incorporation coming in 1783. The region’s lush pine forests may be the source for the tree in the arms.

Arms of Ottavio Piccolomini

Piccolomini
Duke of Amalfi 1639-1656 (1599-1656)

Blazon: Per quarterly I and IV argent on a cross azure five crescents or (Piccolomini); II and III paly of four i or four palets gules (Aragon), ii barry of eight gules and argent (Hungary ancien), iii azure semé de lis or, a label of four points gules (Anjou ancien), iv argent a cross paté between four crosses or (Jerusalem)

Ottavio inherited the quarters of Aragon, Hungary ancien, Anjou ancien, and Jerusalem from his ancestor Antonio Piccolomini d’Aragona, who married Maria d’Aragona, the illegitimate daughter of Ferdinand I of Naples. Many representations have Ferdinand’s arms in the first and third quarters, as Maria’s lineage was (though illegitimate) more noble than Antonio’s.

Arms of Louis d’Appiani d’Aragon

Louis d'Appiani

(1533-1592)

Blazon: Per quarterly I and IV  lozengy argent and gules (Appiani), II and III per quarterly i and iv tierced per pale 1 barry of eight gules and argent (Hungary ancien), 2 azure semé de lis or (France ancien), and 3 argent a cross paté between four crosses or (Jerusalem), ii and iii or four palets gules (Aragon); overall a chief gules a cross argent (Savoy)

“Louis” appears to be Alfonso d’Appiani, brother of Jacopo VI. He seems to have been a military man, possibly serving under Ferdinando II de’ Medici, Grand Duke of Tuscany.

Arms of the House of Appiani of Aragon

Appiani of Aragon

In use since 1445?

Blazon: Per quarterly I and IV  lozengy argent and gules (Appiani), II and III per quarterly i and iv tierced per pale 1 barry of eight gules and argent (Hungary ancien), 2 azure semé de lis or (France ancien), and 3 argent a cross paté between four crosses or (Jerusalem), ii and iii or four palets gules (Aragon)

The alliance between the Appianis and the house of Aragon began (informally) in 1445, when Emanuele Appiani married Colia de’ Giudici, the illegitimate daughter of King Alfonso V of Naples. His great-grandson Jacopo V also married into the house of Aragon via Marianna of Aragon in 1510, though she died before she could bear any children.