It is said that the word King (did by interpretation) signify a government over a thousand men.

– From The Blazon of Gentrie by Sir John Ferne (1586), p140

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[T]he Duke, whose ensignment is a Crown of lilies… is honored with the title and style of Gracious, and Excellent: and he is Princely, but not of Majesty.

– From The Blazon of Gentrie by Sir John Ferne (1586), p137

[T]o the Earl was allowed the Crown Naval, but to the Marquis was anciently given a Crown Mural: and now, being altered with other fashions forsooth, it must rather be
a garland of flowers, that is to say, a Crown fleury, of quatrefoils.

– From The Blazon of Gentrie by Sir John Ferne (1586), p137

This degree of a Marquisate, is questionless, to be preferred as more high and princely than that estate of an Earl: wherein we Englishmen, and also the Italians, observe a commendable order: but the Frenchmen and Germans (as Cassaneus holdeth) do preposterate [reverse] the same… Well, let it be their error.

– From The Blazon of Gentrie by Sir John Ferne (1586), p136

At the first, it was merely an office of deputation… But when as that, the office of an Earl, was erected to a dignity and appointed to follow the blood of him which possessed it: then also, the title and name, of Viscount, was joined as a dignity for the posterity to inherit, and discerned, as a special degree of gentleness and
nobility.

– From The Blazon of Gentrie by Sir John Ferne (1586), p133

The honorable degree of a Baron, is so privileged, in the laws of Arms and constitutions of Caesars… yea they are said to be, of some majesty.

– From The Blazon of Gentrie by Sir John Ferne (1586), p132