Arms of Audley and Quincy

Audley and Quincy
Arms of ‘Hugh de Audley, Baron of Heighley’ and ‘Mabel de Quincy’

From p43 of Lacies Nobilitie by Sir John Ferne (1586)

Blazon: Per pale baron and femme; the first gules a fret or, the second gules six mascles 3, 3, and 1 or

Robert de Quincy and Hawise de Chester only had one daughter, Margaret; there is no evidence of anyone named “Mabel.” Moreover, while there was a Hugh de Audley (the first Earl of Gloucester in its third creation) with the same arms pictured here whose family held Heighley Castle as a seat, he would not be born until 1291, and thus was unlikely to have wed any offspring of Robert and Hawise.

Ferne claims that “Armes Fretty should signifie sorrow and tribulation to the bearer… if any quick [living] thing be oppressed with the Fret, then it may be a just sign of heavinesse.” (69)

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Arms of Lacy and Quincy

Lacy and Quincy

Arms of John de Lacy, Earl of Lincoln 1232-1240 (1192-1240) and Margaret de Quincy, Countess of Lincoln 1232-1266 (c. 1206-1266)

From p43 of Lacies Nobilitie by Sir John Ferne (1586)

Blazon: Per pale baron and femme; the first per quarterly or and gules a bend sable overall a label of three points argent, the second gules six mascles 3, 3, and 1 or

Arms of Quincy and Chester

Quincy and Chester

Arms of Robert de Quincy (?-1217) and Hawise of Chester, Countess of Lincoln 1232-1241? (1180-1241?)

From p43 of Lacies Nobilitie by Sir John Ferne (1586)

Blazon: Per pale baron and femme; the first gules six mascles 3, 3, and 1 or, the second azure three garbs or

Ferne seems to be conflating Robert de Quincy with his brother Roger; he lists Robert as Earl of Winchester, when it was Roger who succeeded their father in 1235, well after Robert’s death.

These are two very, very old English families, so it’s kind of neat to see the union of the two arms. I mean, I’d be much more surprised if they hadn’t intermarried at some point, but the two arms in one coat is still cool, at least in my nerdy opinion.

Arms of Gabriel de Rochechouart

Rochechouart

Marquis of Mortemart 1643-1663, duke of Mortemart 1663-1675 (1600-1675)

Blazon: Party of eight I gules a crescent vair (Maure), II azure three fleurs-de-lis or surmounted by a bendlet couped gules (Bourbon), III gules nine mascles 3, 3, and 3 or (Rohan), IV barry of ten argent and azure, three chevronels gules (La Rochefoucauld); V argent a serpent nowed azure, crowned or, and devouring a child gules (Milan), VI gules a chain in saltire, cross, and orle or, charged with a center point vert (Navarre), VII gules a pale vair (des Cars), VIII ermine (Bretagne); overall in the fess point an escutcheon barry nebuly of six argent and gules (Rochechouart)

Arms of de Gant and Roumare

Gant and Roumare

Arms of Gilbert de Gant, Earl of Lincoln c. 1149-1156 and Baron of Lindsey 1095-1156 (c. 1126-1156), and ‘Hawise de Roumare’

From p30 of Lacies Nobilitie by Sir John Ferne (1586)

Blazon: Per pale, baron and femme; the first or three barrulets azure surmounted by a bend gules, the second gules seven mascles 3, 3, and 1 between ten cross crosslets or 3, 4, 2, and 1

Ferne asserts that Gilbert married one Hawise de Roumare, William’s daughter, and thereby obtained the title Earl of Lincoln. This does not seem to be borne out by the historical record. First, William de Roumare only had one recorded child, a son who was also named William. Hawise was the name of de Roumare’s wife, so Ferne may be conflating the two. Moreover, Gilbert de Gant certainly did not marry into the earldom; when de Roumare took the Empress Matilda’s side during the Anarchy, King Stephen granted the title to de Gant (around 1149 or 1150). Ferne goes out of his way to insist that King Stephen only created de Gant Earl of Lincoln after he married de Roumare’s daughter in accordance with the laws of marriage and inheritance, but given that there is no evidence of a Roumare daughter, this seems improbable (and probably colored by Ferne’s open disdain for King Stephen). He may be conflating de Gant’s wife with Hawise of Chester, who was created the first countess of Lincoln in her own right in 1232.

Arms of Hinckley and Bosworth Borough Council, England

Hinckley and Bosworth Borough Council

Granted 1974

Blazon: Per pale indented argent and gules, on a chief or three torteaux, the center charged with a cinquefoil pierced ermine, the others charged with a mascle of the third

Crest: On a wreath of the colors a dragon gules preying on a boar passant argent

Supporters: On either side a ram reguardant sable, armed or

Mantling: Gules lined argent

Motto: Post proelia concordia (After the battle, peace)

Arms of William de Roumare

de Roumare

Earl of Lincoln 1143-1153? (1096-1153?)

From p30 of Lacies Nobilitie by Sir John Ferne (1586)

Blazon: Gules seven mascles 3, 3, and 1 between ten cross crosslets or 3, 4, 2, and 1

Ferne’s herald character Paradius claims that the mascle is supposed to represent the holes of a net and marks the bearer as “most prudent and politic in the warres… had with some notable stratageme or acte circumvented the enemy.” The color and number of the mascles is also supposed to hold meaning; or means that he was rewarded with material goods, and seven (the Biblical number of perfection) means that his honor was “most perfect, and without reproach.” The cross crosslets or allegedly represented someone devoted to Christ’s sacrifice and who “esteemed of it as most great riches.” (33-4) More probably, the cross crosslets in de Roumare’s arms are a representation of his service against “the Sarazens and Infidels.” (35)