Arms of Wald, Germany

Wald

Granted 1971?

Blazon: Per pale sable a bend chequy argent and gules and argent a mascle gules in base a triple mount vert

The dexter half of the arms are those of the abbey of Salem, while the sinister half is based on the arms of Burkard von Weckenstein, with the tinctures changed to avoid placing the mounts on a field gules. It should also be noted that the von Weckenstein arms are canting; the German word for “mascle” is “Wecke.”

Advertisements

Arms of the Earl and Countess of Lincoln

Lincoln
Arms of John de Lacy, Earl of Lincoln 1232-1240 (c. 1192-1240) and Margaret de Quincy, Countess of Lincoln 1232-1266, suo jure 1240-1266 (c. 1206-1266)

From p114 of Lacies Nobilitie by Sir John Ferne (1586)

Blazon: Per pale baron and femme I per quarterly i and iv per quarterly or and gules a bend sable and a label of three points argent (Lacy), ii and iii or a lion rampant purpre (Nigold/Neale), II per quarterly i gules seven mascles conjoined or 3, 3, and 1 (Quincy), ii per pale azure three garbs or (Chester) and azure a wolf’s head erased argent (d’Avranches), iii gules a cinquefoil ermine (Beaumont), iv gules a pale or (Grandmesnil)

You may recognize the baron’s arms as those of Roger de Lacy, Baron of Halton and Pontefract; John was his eldest son. They were jointly created Countess and Earl of Lincoln in 1232. The grant was mostly due to Margaret, as the title had previously been held by her mother Hawise of Chester. Thus, John was only Earl of Lincoln by right of his wife, and when he died in 1240, she retained her title in her own right.

Arms of de Lacy and de Quincy

Lacy and Quincy

Arms of John de Lacy, Earl of Lincoln 1232-1240 (c. 1192-1240) and Margaret de Quincy, Countess of Lincoln 1240-1266 (c. 1206-1266)

From p122 of Lacies Nobilitie by Sir John Ferne (1586)

Blazon: Per pale baron and femme  or and gules a bend sable and a label of three points argent (Lacy) and  gules seven mascles conjoined or 3, 3, and 1

The title to the earldom of Lincoln was carried through Margaret’s side, inherited from her mother, Hawise of Chester, who inherited the title from her brother Ranulf de Blondeville. As Margaret was the one with the initial right to the title, it returned to her in her own right after John died.

Arms of la Zouche and de Quincy

Zouche and Quincy

Arms of Alan la Zouche (1205-1270) and Ellen de Quincy (?-1296)

From p81 of Lacies Nobilitie by Sir John Ferne (1586)

Blazon: Per pale baron and femme gules thirteen bezants 4, 3, 3, 2, and 1 and a canton ermine and gules seven mascles conjoined or 3, 3, and 1

The la Zouche arms have virtually always involved some number of bezants, but how many depends greatly on the source. The most common is probably ten in pile or 4, 3, 2, and 1, but thirteen or fourteen also occur, and some authorities simply describe them as bezanté, or deliberately unspecified.

Arms of Comyn and de Quincy

Comyn and de Quincy

Arms of Alexander Comyn, Earl of Buchan (?-1289) and Elizabeth de Quincy

Blazon: Per pale baron and femme azure three garbs or and gules seven mascles conjoined 3, 3, and 1

Ferne gives Comyn’s wife’s name as Alice, but it was actually Elizabeth. The couple had at least nine children together.

The arms given here for Comyn are identical to the arms usually used for the Earls of Chester. Some sources have the Comyns as the first Earls of Chester before the title passed to John of Scotland, but I believe this is incorrect. I cannot find any reliable evidence that the Comyns and the Earls of Chester were related. This may be an error, or it may be a case of two families genuinely bearing the same arms. They were, after all, in two different kingdoms (the Comyns were Scottish), and the famous Scrope v. Grosvenor case would not be decided for another hundred years after Alexander Comyn’s death.

Arms of de Ferrers and de Quincy

Ferrers and Quincy

Arms of William de Ferrers, Earl of Derby (1193 – 1254) and Margaret de Quincy (c. 1218 – 1280)

From p81 of Lacies Nobilitie by Sir John Ferne (1586)

Blazon: Per pale baron and femme argent six horseshoes sable and gules seven mascles conjoined 3, 3, and 1 or

I have previously discussed the disagreement over the Ferrers arms here. Ferne incorrectly refers to William as the Lord of Groby. The first Lord of Groby was William and Margaret’s grandson, also named William, who received the title in 1299 William and Margaret married in 1238 and had five children, including the heir to Derby, Robert. William previously had seven daughters with his first wife, the youngest of whom, Eleanor, later married Margaret’s father, Roger de Quincy.

Arms of de Quincy and Galloway

Quincy and Galloway

Arms of Roger de Quincy, Earl of Winchester (1195-1264) and Helen of Galloway

From p81 of Lacies Nobilitie by Sir John Ferne (1586)

Blazon: Per pale baron and femme gules seven mascles 3, 3, and 1 or and argent an escutcheon within a tresseure fleury counter-fleury gules

Helen of Galloway was the daughter of Alan of Galloway, Lord of Galloway and Constable of Scotland. Through their marriage, Roger inherited one-third of the Lordship. He also received the earldom when his mother died in 1235. The arms in the sinister half of the shield allegedly belong to Alan of Galloway, but I cannot corroborate this anywhere. (The tinctures are also somewhat unclear.)