Arms of the borough of Barnet, London, England

Barnet

Granted 1965

Blazon: Azure on a mount in base a Paschal lamb proper; on a chief per pale argent and gules a Saxon crown or between two roses counterchanged barbed and seeded proper

Crest: On a wreath of the colors a two-bladed airscrew in pale winged or surmounted by two swords in saltire points upwards proper

Supporters: On the dexter a lion and on the sinister a stag argent charged on the shoulder with a cross potent quadrate gules

Mantling: Azure lined argent

Motto: Unitas efficit ministerium (Unity accomplishes service)

The borough was formed from a combination of other boroughs, most of which are represented in the achievement. The Paschal lamb and the airscrew are from Hendon; the supporters are from Finchley; the crosses potent quadrate are from Friern Barnet. The red and white roses featured in the arms of both Barnet and East Barnet as a reference to the Battle of Barnet from the Wars of the Roses.

There is so much going on here, and I’m not sure any of it is good. Setting aside the fact that it’s basically impossible to make these arms work within the law of tinctures and the completely unnecessary compartment, my biggest complaint has to be the crest. First, that does NOT look like a propeller. I only figured out it’s supposed to be a two-bladed propeller seen from the front from the blazon. That’s not good. Secondly, it’s a fucking propeller. It’s already an allusion to aviation. You don’t need to put fucking wings on it. Third, I’m going to borrow Fox-Davies’ complaint about more modern crests: they were originally intended to be worn on top of a helmet. How the fuck are you supposed to balance that thing on your head? Would it even be identifiable from a distance? This is such a trainwreck, even the counterchanged reference to the Wars of the Roses isn’t enough to save it.

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Arms of London, England

London

Granted 1957; in use since before 1483

Blazon: Argent a cross gules in the first quarter a sword in pale point in chief of the last

Crest: On a wreath of the colors a dragon’s sinister wing argent charged with a cross gules

Supporters: Two dragons argent charged on the wings with a cross gules

Mantling: Gules lined argent

Motto: Domine dirige nous (God direct us)

Most of the imagery in the arms of London is connected to the patron saint of England, Saint George, and his legendary slaying of the dragon. The saint’s symbol is argent, a cross gules, which recurs throughout the arms, as does the dragon. The sword is a symbol of St. Paul, to whom the first cathedral in London was dedicated.

I couldn’t not do London. I mean, they’re famous (as famous as arms get, anyways) with a shitton of religious iconography, so I couldn’t ignore them. What I did not expect to find, though, was that the arms were not confirmed until 195freaking7. That’s over five centuries of continuous use, predating the English College of Arms itself, and no one thought to give the capital city of freaking England a grant until after the toaster oven was invented? Nintendo had been around for sixty-eight years at that point! What the actual fuck.

Arms of Sleaford Town Council, England

Sleaford

Granted 1950

Blazon: Gules on a chevron or three estoiles sable, on a chief argent as many trefoils slipped vert

Crest: On a wreath gules and or an eagle wings displayed and elevated and head downwards and to the sinister proper holding in the beak an ear of wheat stalked and leaved or

Mantling: Gules lined or

The arms in the primary part of the shield belong to the Carre family, who founded the local almshouse and grammar school, while the trefoils are from the arms of the Harveys. The eagle represents the town’s associations with the Royal Air Force, while the wheat represents local agriculture.

Arms of Newark Town Council, England

Newark

Granted 1561

Blazon: Barry wavy of six argent and azure on a chief gules a peacock in his pride proper between a fleur-de-lis on the dexter and a lion passant guardant on the sinister or

Crest: On a wreath argent and azure a morfex* argent beaked sable holding in its beak an eel proper

Supporters: On the dexter, an otter, on the sinister a beaver, all proper

Mantling: Gules lined argent

Motto: Deo fretus erumpe (Trust God and sally)

*The actual identity of this bird is unclear; this spelling does not reliably occur anywhere else. Possibilities include a moorhen, a martlet, a heron, a cormorant, or a grouse. (Campbell, Jillian, and Mike Cox. Secret Newark. Amberly Publishing Limited, 2015. Google Book Search. Web. 10 July 2016.)

Arms of Eastwood Town Council, England

Eastwood Town Council

Granted 1951

Blazon: Lozengy argent and sable, on a chief or an annulet of the second between two torteaux

Crest: On a wreath or and gules in front of a wheel issuant therefrom a mount sable lozengy argent rising therefrom in its flames a phoenix proper

Mantling: Gules lined or

Motto: We seek the best

The annulet is derived from the Plumtree arms, and the torteaux from the Greys of Codnor. The black diamonds and the flames in the crest are intended to symbolize coal mining and the energy derived from it. The wheel is a reference to the town’s history with the Midland Counties Railway, which was initiated in Eastwood in 1832.

Arms of Braunstone Town Council, England

Braunstone

Granted 1976

Blazon: Gules on a fess wavy azure fimbriated or between in chief a maunch argent between two bezants and in base a cross paté argent, two shovellers close of the last

Crest: On a wreath argent and gules a stag statant resting its dexter leg on a mound of stones, all proper

Mantling: Gules lined argent

Motto: Spectemur agendo (Let us be judged by our actions)

Arms of Bourne Town Council, England

Bourne

Granted 1953

Blazon: Or on a fess azure between in chief three torteaux and in base a Wake knot gules, a bar wavy argent

Crest: On a wreath of the colors issuant from the battlements of a tower gules a demi-lion ermine holding between the paws an escutcheon azure charged with a fleur-de-lis argent

Mantling: Azure lined or

Motto: Vigila et ora (Watch and pray)