Arms of Ruidera, Spain

ALT
Granted 1998

Blazon: Per pale argent a pall gules and of the last, a Maltese cross of the first, pointé in base barry wavy of the first and azure

Although Ruidera fell into the territory of the Order of Santiago (per a 1237 treaty), it ultimately ended up as the property of the Order of St. John in 1783, which is probably the source for the Maltese cross. There are also many lagoons and wetlands in the area under national protection, which may be the source of the barry wavy point.

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Arms of Puerto Lápice, Spain

Puerto Lapice

In use since at least 2013

Per fess argent a Maltese cross gules between two laurel branches proper and vert a tower or windowed sable

The Maltese cross is probably a reference to the Order of St. John, which maintained control over the area until 1784.

Arms of Las Labores, Spain

Las Labores

Granted 2005

Blazon: Per fess gules a Maltese cross argent and of the second a cross of Burgundy couped of the first

The cross of Burgundy was formerly a symbol of the Valois Dukes of Burgundy. The duchy was later incorporated into the Habsburgs’ holdings. When the Habsburgs inherited the crowns of Castile and Aragon, the cross of Burgundy came into use as a Spanish symbol. It is also called the Cross of St. Andrew; I have used the former name to distinguish it from the argent saltire on azure that is the British Cross of St. Andrew.

Arms of Argamasilla de Alba, Spain

Argamasilla de Alba

Granted 1974

Blazon: Per fess I per pale gules a Maltese cross argent and chequy of fifteen azure and the second, II of the third a sword in bend and a spear in bend sinister, points to the chief, surmounted by “Mambrino’s helmet,” all of the second.

This depiction is not particularly accurate; the original blazon specifies that the lower half of the shield should be azure, with argent charges. Inexplicably, the official site of the city uses a very similar depiction as that seen here.

The final charge is a reference to an incident in the Cervantes novel Don Quixote de la Mancha. The titular character sees a barber caught in the rain and wearing a basin as an impromptu hat, and declares this basin to be the fabled helmet of the legendary Moorish king Mambrino, which is supposed to make the wearer invulnerable. The novel also makes reference to the town, and a local legend holds (without much proof) that Cervantes was once imprisoned in a cave near the town.

Arms of Arenas de San Juan, Spain

Arenas de San Juan

In use since at least 1989

Blazon: Per fess sable charged with a bar wavy azure, I per pale gules a tower or windowed of the second and of the third a Maltese cross argent, II of the second a wall of four towers of the fourth windowed and masoned of the first

The wall in the lower half of the arms presumably represents the local Roman observation tower. The town’s name derives from the sandy terrain (arenales) and its history with the Order of St. John, which is likely the source of the Maltese cross.

Arms of Braintree District Council, England

Granted 1974

Blazon: Gules on a pale or between two seaxes palewise points upward addorsed argent hilted and pommeled of the second two lioncels azure; overall a on a fess wavy argent another sable

Crest: On a wreath of the colors a garb or surmounted by a mount vert, thereupon a boar passant azure crined and unguled of the second supporting with the dexter forehoof a Maltese Cross gules

Supporters: Two lions sable, armed and langued gules, each gorged with a riband argent pendent therefrom by a ring a molet of the last surmounted by a pentagon or fimbriated and charged with a fleur-de-lis vert and holding in the mouth a shuttle erect threaded proper.

Mantling: Gules lined or

Motto: By wisdom and foresight