Arms of the borough of Wandsworth

Wandsworth

London, England

Granted 1965

Blazon: Per pale indented argent and azure a fess chequy of the second and or, each of the last charged with a goutte of the second

Crest: On a wreath of the colors an ancient ship with a dragon’s head at the prow sable four oars in action and as many shields or on the bulwarks, flying a pennon gules and a sail of the arms

Supporters: On the dexter a dove wings elevated and addorsed azure and charged with four molets of five points or, in the beak a sprig of lavender proper; on the sinister a dragon sable wings elevated and addorsed argent and charged with four crosses couped gules

Mantling: Azure lined argent

Motto: We Serve

The field of the arms is derived from the London borough of Battersea. The fess chequy is from the arms of William de Warren, first Earl of Surrey, and the gouttes represent the tears shed by the prosecuted French Huguenots, as many of them settled in Wandsworth when fleeing persecution in the seventeenth century.

Advertisements

Arms of the borough of Tower Hamlets, London, England

Tower Hamlets

Granted 1965

Blazon: Argent on a base wavy azure charged with two bars wavy of the field a lymphad sail furled sable pennon and flags flying gules, on a chief of the second between a pair of fire tongs and a weaver’s shuttle a pale of the first charged with a sprig of mulberry fructed proper

Crest: On a wreath of the colors in front of a representation of the White Tower of the Tower of London proper two anchors in saltire or

Supporters: On the dexter side a sea-horse, on the sinister side a talbot, all proper

Mantling: Azure lined argent

Motto: From great things to greater

Most of the elements in this achievement are drawn from the arms of the borough of Stepney, which was incorporated into Tower Hamlets in 1965. The fire tongs are the symbol of St. Dunstan, who held the Manor of Stepney when he was Bishop of London.

Arms of the Royal Borough of Kingston upon Thames

Kingston upon Thames

London, England

Granted 1966

Blazon: Azure three salmon naiant in pale argent finned and tailed gules

Crest: On a wreath of the colors issuant from a wreath of bay leaves vert banded or a demi-stag proper gorged with a crown of or pendant therefrom an escutcheon ermine on a chevron vert between two chevronels the chief per pale azure and gules, the base per pale gules and azure, a cross paté or, holding between the forelegs a fountain

Supporters: Two stags proper gorged with a ribbon argent pendant therefrom an escutcheon azure issuant from the base an elm tree proper in front of a sun rising or and resting the interior hind hoof on a charred woodstock proper

Compartment*: A grassy mount proper supported by a fillet wavy pre fess wavy argent and azure

Mantling: Azure lined argent

The arms are derived from the historical arms of the borough, recorded as far back as 1572; the three salmon refer to three fisheries mentioned in the Domesday Book. The escutcheon on the crest bears the arms of the Borough of Malden and Coombe, and the supporters’ escutcheons show the arms of the Borough of Surbiton.

*Compartments are usually left to the discretion of the artist, not specified in the blazon.

Arms of the borough of Harrow

Harrow

London, England

Arms and crest granted 1938, supporters granted 1954

Blazon: Or a fess arched vert, in chief on a pile gules between a torch sable enflamed proper and a quill pen of the fourth a clarion of the field, in base issuant from a mount a wood of trees of the second

Crest: Issuant from a mural crown proper a demi-lion rampant holding between the paws an arrow fesswise argent enfiled with a wreath of oak also proper

Supporters: On the dexter a representation of Hygeia supporting with her exterior hand a staff entwined with a snake, on the sinister a Benedictine monk supporting with the exterior hand a staff, all proper

Mantling: Vert lined or

Motto: Salus populi suprema lex (The well-being of the people is the highest law)

The fess vert represents the green spaces in the borough. The torch and quill pen refer to knowledge and the famous writers of the borough (such as Lord Byron, educated at the Harrow School). The pile is drawn from the Chandos arms. The clarion supposedly refers to the borough’s connection with Handel, although he lived in Mayfair.

Arms of the borough of Haringey

Haringey

Granted 1965

Blazon: Sable eight rays of lightning issuant from the fess point throughout or

Crest: On a wreath of the colors in front of a demi-sun in splendor or a demi-cogwheel sable

Mantling: Sable lined or

Motto: Progress with humanity

The lightning rays are intended to refer to the fact that the borough contains Alexandra Palace, from which the first the television broadcast was made.

Arms of the borough of Greenwich

Greenwich

London, England

Granted 1965

Blazon: Per chevron argent and gules in chief an hourglass proper between two estoiles of six points azure, in base three cannon barrels erect palewise proper, each charged on the breech with a lion’s face or

Motto: We govern by serving

The hourglass and estoiles refer to the Greenwich Observatory, and the cannon barrels to the Royal Arsenal.

Arms of the borough of Croyden

Croyden

London, England

Granted 1965

Blazon: Argent on a cross flory sable between in chief dexter two swords in saltire and sinister two keys in saltire, both azure and gules, five bezants

Crest: On a mural crown or a fountain between a branch of oak leaved and fructed and a branch of beech slipped proper

Supporters: On the dexter a lion sable and on the sinister a horse argent each with a cross formy fitchy pendant from a collar counterchanged

Mantling: Sable lined argent

Motto: Ad summa nitamur (Let us strive for perfection)

The cross flory comes from the arms of John Whitgift, Archbishop of Canterbury, by way of the County Borough of Croyden. The keys and swords refer to the Abbey of St. Peter and St. Paul. The fountain symbolizes the source of the River Wandle, and the white horse is from the arms of the Earls of Surrey.