Arms of Simaringendorf, Germany

Simaringendorf
In use since at least 2008

Blazon: Per fess I per bend sinister gules two hammers in saltire or and of the last a plowshare of the first, II of the first a stag statant of the second

The stag is drawn from the arms of the county that shares its name with the village, while the hammers represent the local steelworks and the plowshare stands for agriculture.

Advertisements

Arms of Birmingham, England

Birmingham

Granted 1977

Blazon: Per quarterly I and IV azure a bend of five lozenges conjoined or, II and III per pale indented or and gules, overall on a cross ermine a mitre proper

Crest: On a wreath or and azure issuant from a mural crown or charged with a Tudor rose a dexter arm embowed holding a hammer all proper

Supporters: On the dexter a figure representing Art proper vested argent wreathed with laurel vert tied by a riband gules, holding in the sinister hand resting on the shield a book bound of the last and in the dexter a palette with two brushes proper; on the sinister a figure representing Industry habited as a smith, holding in the dexter hand resting on the shield a cupel and in the sinister a hammer resting on an anvil all proper

Mantling: Azure lined or

Motto: Forward

Both coats quartered here were used by the de Bermingham family at various points in time. The family also quartered the coats, but in opposite quarters; the city changed the order for difference. The city was previously granted arms in 1889, which used a fess ermine instead of a cross, and a mural crown instead of a mitre. The supporters in the previous arms were also reversed, with Industry on the dexter and Art on the sinister.

Arms of Dellach, Austria

Dellach

Granted 1982

Blazon: Or a bend sinister wavy between in chief a fleur-de-lis and in base two hammers in saltire azure

The bend sinister symbolizes the Gail river, and the hammers allude to the mining industry. The fleur-de-lis is borrowed from the arms of the house of Porcia, an Italian noble family who later served the Habsburgs. Legend has it an ancestor of the family went to France to seek permission to bear the fleur-de-lis in their arms, which was granted.

Arms of Burgauberg-Neudauberg, Austria

Burgauberg-Neudauberg

Granted 1985

Blazon: Per bend sinister wavy azure or and vert, in chief three stalks of wheat palewise in fess, in base a hammer palewise surmounted by two oak leaves in saltire counterchanged

The bend sinister refers to the river Lafnitz, while the other tinctures are drawn from the coats of arms of Styria (vert and argent) and Burgenland (or and gules). The rest of the charges are symbols of local industries: agriculture and forestry.