Arms of Draßburg, Austria

Drassburg

Granted 1998

Blazon: Per fess azure a passion cross or upon a triple mount in base proper and per pale of the first a griffin counter-segreant crowned and bearing a scimitar in the left of the second and in the right three roses gules, slipped and leaved proper, and of the second between a stag’s attires a cross paté of the first.

I don’t have a direct source for the cross, but it seems like a pretty standard thing to put on your municipal arms if you are a small Christian community. However, I do have sources for the base half of the shield. The griffin – crown, scimitar, roses, and all – is taken from the Esterházy arms, which are fucking amazing. I will have to come back to those sometime in the future, because WOW. The Esterházys controlled roughly one-third of the area that currently forms Draßburg from sometime in the 1620s through 1848. Similarly, the other quarter of the shield is derived from the Zichy arms; they controlled the other two-thirds of the area from 1672 to 1715 and from 1795 to 1848. (The Zichys sold the area to the Mesko family in 1715, but after eighty years’ worth of legal proceedings, the Meskos were ordered to give it back.) If you’re wondering what happened in 1848, well… let’s just say the Austrian nobility went into a sharp decline right around then.

Arms of Staffordshire County, England

Staffordshire

Granted 1931

Blazon: Or on a chevron gules a Stafford knot of the first, on a chief azure a lion passant guardant of the field

Crest: Issuant from a mural crown proper a Stafford knot or

Supporters: On the dexter a lion reguardant gules ducally crowned or and on the sinister a griffin reguardant of the second

Mantling: Gules lined or

Motto: The knot unites

While the knot is the most common symbol of the Stafford family (who bear or a chevron gules), the lion and griffin are also Stafford badges.

Arms of the borough of Hounslow, London, England

Hounslow

Granted 1964

Blazon: Per fess azure and gules on a fess wavy between two wings conjoined in base argent surmounted by a sword erect or, in base a lion rampant guardant per fess of the fourth and third, a barrulet wavy of the first

Crest: On a wreath of the colors upon ferns proper a tablot passant sable supporting over the shoulder a post horn or

Supporters: Two griffins or gorged with collars gemel wavy azure charged on the wings with as many seaxes

Mantling: Azure lined argent

Motto: Juncti progrediamur (Let us go forward together)

The wings and sword represent London Airport and the aircraft industry. The lion is from the arms of Hounslow Priory. The fess and barrulet(s) are from the  Borough of Brentford and Chiswick, representing the rivers Brent and Thames

The blazon specifies one barrulet, but this depiction shows two. Either the number of the barrulets or the descriptor is off; it could be a barrulet gemel, which would be indicated by the collars on the supporters.

Arms of the borough of Camden

Camden

London, England

Granted 1965

Blazon: Argent on a cross gules a mitre or; on a chief sable three escallops of the field

Crest: On a wreath of the colors issuant from a mural crown argent a demi-elephant sable armed or and gorged with a wreath of holly fructed proper

Supporters: On the dexter a lion and on the sinister a griffin or, each gorged with a collar, the dexter argent charged with three molets of five points sable, the sinister of the last charged with as many molets of as many points of the second, pendant from each a fountain

Mantling: Gules lined argent

Motto: Non sibi sed toti (Not for self but for all)

The cross, mural crown, and supporters are derived from the arms of the former borough of Holborn, while those of Hampstead yielded the mitre and the holly wreath, and the escallops and elephant are from St. Pancras. The supporters each correspond to one of the Inns of Court in the borough; the lion is for Lincoln’s Inn, and the griffin for Gray’s.

You know what, it could be worse. At least some of the way-too-many charges are interesting – you don’t see a lot of elephants, and I obviously have a soft spot for griffins. Yes, the level of detail on the collars is incredibly nitpicky, and the colors in this depiction don’t entirely match the blazon, but the actual arms themselves aren’t terrible. The argent-cross-gules is a reference to the city arms, and it obeys the laws of tincture, and honestly, the arms of the London boroughs are so weird and visually messy that I’ll just take what I can get.