Arms of Huntingdon and de Blondeville

Huntingdon and de Blondeville

Arms of David of Scotland, Earl of Huntingdon 1214?-1219 (1144-1219) and Matilda de Blondeville (1171-1233)

From p43 of Lacies Nobilitie by Sir John Ferne (1586)

Blazon: Per pale baron and femme; the first argent an escutcheon within a tresseure fleury counter-fleury gules, the second azure three garbs or

As grandson of David I of Scotland and younger brother of William I of Scotland, David was entitled to bear the royal arms with a difference. Judging from Ferne’s depiction, he used two methods of differencing that are more typical of
Scottish heraldry than English: changing the tinctures and using a different charge. The tresseure and use of gules still clearly connects him to the royal family of Scotland. According to Ferne, the nontraditional differencing is due to
his royal blood, since “for the difference being little & in the feeld far off, not easely to be perceaved, should bring a confusion to the people, so that is should be difficult to them, to discerne which is their King.” (63)  He
attributes the specific choice of argent and an escutcheon to “the defense of verity, and sincere truth, signified by the cullor of white.” (65)

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Arms of Kevelioc and Lucye

Kevelioc and Lucye

Arms of Hugh de Kevelioc, Earl of Chester 1153-1181 (1147-1181) and ‘Beatrix Lucye’

From p43 of Lacies Nobilitie by Sir John Ferne (1586)

Blazon: Per pale baron and femme; the first azure three garbs or, the second gules three lucies hauriant argent

Ferne seems to include Hugh mostly to castigate him for his role in revolting against Henry II in 1173. Once again, Ferne’s information on the wife seems to be inaccurate; Kevelioc married Bertrade de Montfort, who seems to have been a French noblewoman (at least, her grandfather certainly held land in Normandy). However, Ferne clearly believes that Kevelioc married into the Lucy family, regardless of the fact that Kevelioc’s granddaughter Margaret de Quincy’s later married into the same family.

Arms of de Gernon and Gloucester

de Gernon and Gloucester
Arms of Ranulf de Gernon, Earl of Chester 1128-1153 (1099-1153) and Maud of Gloucester (?-1189)

From p43 of Lacies Nobilitie by Sir John Ferne (1586)

Blazon: Per pale baron and femme; the first azure three garbs or, the second or three chevronels gules

The arms Ferne gives for Maud (whom he calls Alice) seem to be skipping ahead a few decades. The chevronels are well-known as the arms of the Clare family, who would inherit the earldom of Gloucester in 1225. Maud’s father Robert was the first earl of Gloucester and (probably) the first illegitimate son of Henry I. Since he was born before his father ascended the throne, it is unknown if he bore arms or what they would have been.

Arms of West Lindsey District Council, England

West Lindsey

Granted 1974

Blazon: Vert a fess ermine of five spots between in chief an eagle displayed, wings inverted perched on a thunderbolt fesswise between two garbs or and in base on water barry wavy argent and azure a Viking ship of third, sails of the fourth

Crest: On a wreath vert and argent on a mount an oak tree proper fructed or bound thereto by a chain proper two anchors in saltire of the third

Supporters: On the dexter a Lincolnshire Red Shorthorn Bull and on the sinister a Lincoln Longwool Ram both guardant proper, each supporting a croizer or

Mantling: Vert lined argent

Motto: Strive for the gain of all

Arms of le Meschin and ‘de Vere’

le Meschin and de Vere

Arms of Ranulf le Meschin, Earl of Chester 1120-1129 (1070-1129) and ‘Maud de Vere’

From p42 of Lacies Nobilitie by Sir John Ferne (1586)

Blazon: Per pale baron and femme; the first azure three garbs or, the second per quarterly or and gules, in the second quarter a rowel argent(?)

Ferne gives le Meschin credit for originating the azure-and-or arms of Chester (though I cannot verify the use of these arms before Hugh de Kevelioc ascended to the title in 1153). The garb, unsurprisingly, is said to represent “perfect
notes of aboundaunce” and “the fruite of that most happy mother peace.” (49) Ferne takes time to specifically commend the heraldic use of agricultural symbols: “[A]nye instrument appertaining to the tilling & earing of the earth, or
any fruit or seed proceeding and growing by the industry of man, maye bee borne in Armes, and it is good armory.” (51)

I cannot find any evidence that anyone named “Maud de Vere” existed. Historically, Ranulf le Meschin wed Lucy of Bolingbroke. (The previously-mentioned William de Roumare was her son from her second marriage to Roger Fitzgerold de Roumare.)

However, the information on Ferne’s family tree, as well as the coat of arms, seems to indicate some connection to the de Vere family which is not borne out by other available evidence. Ferne’s depiction of the arms has some clear
differences – the colors of the quarters are reversed, and the molet is pierced and in the wrong quarter.

Arms of South Northamptonshire District Council, England

South Northamptonshire

In use since 1974?

Blazon: Azure a lion rampant within an orle of garbs or

Crest: On a wreath of the colors from a coronet or a cock’s head gules combed and wattled of the first, all between two roses of the second barbed and seeded proper

Mantling: Azure lined or

Motto: Hora e sempre (Now and always)