Arms of the borough of Amber Valley

Amber Valley

Derbyshire, England

Granted 1989

Blazon: Vert a pale wavy or within a bordure argent charged with five horseshoes sable, on a chief of the second between two lozenges a cresset sable fired proper

Crest: On a wreath of the colors the battlements of a tower proper issuant therefrom between two croizers or an oak tree also proper fructed and ensigned by a crown of fleurs-de-lis of the first

Supporters: On the dexter a unicorn argent armed and crined or gorged with a collar pendant therefrom a cross flory gules; on the sinister a leopard proper gorged with a collar gules pendant therefrom a fleur-de-lis or

Mantling: Vert lined or

Motto: Per laborem progredimur (By hard work we progress)

The pale wavy evidently represents the river Amber, while the lozenges and cresset symbolize the coal and iron industries. The horseshoes on the bordure are taken from (one of the versions of) the arms of the Ferrers family.

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Arms of the House of Medici

Medici

In use 1465 – 1737

Blazon: Or five torteaux in orle, in chief a roundel of France

In 1465, King Louis XI of France granted Piero di Cosimo de’Medici (also known as Piero the Gouty) the right to bear a roundel of France as part of the family arms. The grant was apparently made out of respect for the family’s financial acumen rather than as a sign of political or familial affiliation. The Medici continued to bear these arms until they went extinct in 1737, when Gian Gastone de’Medici, Grand Duke of Tuscany, died without issue.

Arms of Dellach, Austria

Dellach

Granted 1982

Blazon: Or a bend sinister wavy between in chief a fleur-de-lis and in base two hammers in saltire azure

The bend sinister symbolizes the Gail river, and the hammers allude to the mining industry. The fleur-de-lis is borrowed from the arms of the house of Porcia, an Italian noble family who later served the Habsburgs. Legend has it an ancestor of the family went to France to seek permission to bear the fleur-de-lis in their arms, which was granted.

Arms of Fernán Caballero, Spain

Fernan Caballero

Granted 1993

Blazon: Per fess I per pale i azure three fleurs-de-lis or and ii per pale 1 gules a castle triple-towered or windowed azure (Castile) and 2 argent a lion rampant purpre, langued gules and crowned or (Leon); II argent issuant from water in base barry azure and the field a holly oak tree proper

The town is supposedly named after Ferrant Cavallero, a warrior in the Reconquista and the first lord of the town. The first records of the town date back to the 12th century during Reconquista.

Arms of Cesare Borgia

Cesare Borgia

(1475-1507)

Blazon: Per quarterly I and IV or a bull passant gules on a base vert within a bordure of the field charged with eight flames of the last (Borgia), II and III per quarterly i and iv azure three fleurs-de-lis or, ii and iii gules (Albret)

Cesare’s arms show the Borgia’s family arms quartered with those of his wife, Charlotte d’Albret, sister of King John III of Navarre. They married in 1499, and she bore Cesare’s only legitimate child, Louise Borgia.

Arms of Almadén, Spain

Almaden

Arms of Almadén, Spain

In use since at least 2007

Blazon: Per quarterly I gules a castle triple-towered or windowed azure (Castile); II argent a lion rampant gules, armed, langued, and crowned or (Léon); III argent a cross of Calatrava gules; IV gules two hammers in saltire or; overall in an escutcheon azure three fleurs-de-lis or within a bordure gules(Anjou moderne)

The hammers are likely a reference to the importance of mining in the town’s history. Almadén was a major source of mercury and cinnabar since Roman times. Carlos III established an Academy of Mining in the region in 1777. The name of the town is derived from the Arabic “hisn al-ma’din”, or “fort of the mine.” The cross probably reflects Alfonso VII’s grant of the region to the Order of Calatrava in 1168.