Arms of Dienersdorf, Austria

ALT
Granted 1993

Blazon: Party of six argent and gules, two branches raguly and enflamed in pale counterchanged

The branches are apparently a reference to the Diethbrant von Safen, the first lord of the region. The “brant” part of his name recalls “Brand,” or “fire.”

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Arms of Cesare Borgia

Cesare Borgia

(1475-1507)

Blazon: Per quarterly I and IV or a bull passant gules on a base vert within a bordure of the field charged with eight flames of the last (Borgia), II and III per quarterly i and iv azure three fleurs-de-lis or, ii and iii gules (Albret)

Cesare’s arms show the Borgia’s family arms quartered with those of his wife, Charlotte d’Albret, sister of King John III of Navarre. They married in 1499, and she bore Cesare’s only legitimate child, Louise Borgia.

Arms of Rodrigo Borgia

Rodrigo Borgia

Later Pope Alexander VI (1421-1503)

Blazon: Per pale or a bull passant gules on a base vert within a bordure of the field charged with eight flames of the last and barry of six or and gules*

Rodrigo used these arms at least since his election to the papacy; he may have taken that opportunity to add to his family’s traditional arms. I cannot find any record of the origin of the sinister arms, though several other later Borgias used them as well. They may be a reference to the arms of Aragon, where he was born.

*Also seen as sable

Arms of the House of Borgia

Borgia

In use since 1455?

Blazon: Or a bull passant gules on a base vert within a bordure of the field charged with eight flames of the last

The Borgias are possibly the most famous (or infamous) family of the Italian Renaissance. The family produced two Popes (Callixtus III and Alexander VI) and countless scandalous tales of bribery, murder, poisoning, adultery, and incest. The family’s decline began in earnest after Alexander VI’s death in 1503, helped along by their scurrilous reputation. The line became officially extinct in 1740.