Arms of Audley and Quincy

Audley and Quincy
Arms of ‘Hugh de Audley, Baron of Heighley’ and ‘Mabel de Quincy’

From p43 of Lacies Nobilitie by Sir John Ferne (1586)

Blazon: Per pale baron and femme; the first gules a fret or, the second gules six mascles 3, 3, and 1 or

Robert de Quincy and Hawise de Chester only had one daughter, Margaret; there is no evidence of anyone named “Mabel.” Moreover, while there was a Hugh de Audley (the first Earl of Gloucester in its third creation) with the same arms pictured here whose family held Heighley Castle as a seat, he would not be born until 1291, and thus was unlikely to have wed any offspring of Robert and Hawise.

Ferne claims that “Armes Fretty should signifie sorrow and tribulation to the bearer… if any quick [living] thing be oppressed with the Fret, then it may be a just sign of heavinesse.” (69)

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It is said that the word King (did by interpretation) signify a government over a thousand men.

– From The Blazon of Gentrie by Sir John Ferne (1586), p140

Arms of Lacy and Quincy

Lacy and Quincy

Arms of John de Lacy, Earl of Lincoln 1232-1240 (1192-1240) and Margaret de Quincy, Countess of Lincoln 1232-1266 (c. 1206-1266)

From p43 of Lacies Nobilitie by Sir John Ferne (1586)

Blazon: Per pale baron and femme; the first per quarterly or and gules a bend sable overall a label of three points argent, the second gules six mascles 3, 3, and 1 or

The Gentleman, Knight, Baron, and the like, do wear their helments with the beaver looking over the shoulder, to signify, that they, marching before their Duke or Captain (as at the first that dignity was but an office) do regard and look towards him to attend his pleasure and direction in what he will command.

– From The Blazon of Gentrie by Sir John Ferne (1586), p139

Arms of John of Scotland

John of Scotland

Earl of Huntingdon 1232-1237 (1207-1237)

From p43 of Lacies Nobilitie by Sir John Ferne (1586)

Blazon: Argent three garbs within a tresseure fleury counter-fleury gules

“For that he was created Earl of Chester by H[enry] III… he assumed these three Garbes: and so in the substance of the charge of his coate, he did imitate the
ensignes of his mother: but in the cullors, and also in the double trassure, he represented the coat of Galloway, being the Armes of his father, and all this in one Sheeld.” (65-66)

(I cannot confirm via other sources that these arms were used by John of Scotland, but honestly, they should’ve been. They’re a nice visual combination of his title and heritage, and garbs gules aren’t very common.)

All [princes] do ensign their Chapeau and helm with a Crown of flowers and crosses. And they are enabled by observation of Armory, to wear the like helm and Chapeau,
that the Duke or King doth wear.

– From The Blazon of Gentrie by Sir John Ferne (1586), p138

Arms of Quincy and Chester

Quincy and Chester

Arms of Robert de Quincy (?-1217) and Hawise of Chester, Countess of Lincoln 1232-1241? (1180-1241?)

From p43 of Lacies Nobilitie by Sir John Ferne (1586)

Blazon: Per pale baron and femme; the first gules six mascles 3, 3, and 1 or, the second azure three garbs or

Ferne seems to be conflating Robert de Quincy with his brother Roger; he lists Robert as Earl of Winchester, when it was Roger who succeeded their father in 1235, well after Robert’s death.

These are two very, very old English families, so it’s kind of neat to see the union of the two arms. I mean, I’d be much more surprised if they hadn’t intermarried at some point, but the two arms in one coat is still cool, at least in my nerdy opinion.