Arms of the Earl and Countess of Lincoln

Lincoln
Arms of John de Lacy, Earl of Lincoln 1232-1240 (c. 1192-1240) and Margaret de Quincy, Countess of Lincoln 1232-1266, suo jure 1240-1266 (c. 1206-1266)

From p114 of Lacies Nobilitie by Sir John Ferne (1586)

Blazon: Per pale baron and femme I per quarterly i and iv per quarterly or and gules a bend sable and a label of three points argent (Lacy), ii and iii or a lion rampant purpre (Nigold/Neale), II per quarterly i gules seven mascles conjoined or 3, 3, and 1 (Quincy), ii per pale azure three garbs or (Chester) and azure a wolf’s head erased argent (d’Avranches), iii gules a cinquefoil ermine (Beaumont), iv gules a pale or (Grandmesnil)

You may recognize the baron’s arms as those of Roger de Lacy, Baron of Halton and Pontefract; John was his eldest son. They were jointly created Countess and Earl of Lincoln in 1232. The grant was mostly due to Margaret, as the title had previously been held by her mother Hawise of Chester. Thus, John was only Earl of Lincoln by right of his wife, and when he died in 1240, she retained her title in her own right.

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Arms of Anne of Bohemia

Anne of Bohemia
Queen of England 1382-1394 (1366-1394)

From p104 of Lacies Nobilitie by Sir John Ferne (1586)

Blazon: Per quarterly I and IV per quarterly i and iv azure three fleurs-de-lis or (France), ii and iii gules three lions passant guardant or armed and langued azure (England); II and III per quarterly i and iv or a double-headed eagle displayed sable armed and langued gules (Holy Roman Empire), ii and iii gules a lion rampant argent*

*Ferne describes this last coat as “the coate belonging to her family and house,” which does seem to be accurate. However, these arms seem to have originated with Anne’s grandfather, John the Blind, who quartered them with the more customary arms of Luxembourg (barry argent and azure a lion rampant double-queued gules armed, langued, and crowned or). He may have chosen to invert the tinctures of the ancient arms of the Dukes of Limburg, his ancestral line.

Torquatus points out, correctly, that this arrangement of the arms implies that Anne was an heiress, which she was not. Paradius (Ferne’s mouthpiece character) concedes the point, admitting that this arrangement is rare, but goes on to argue that this is a legitimate configuration of arms, since it is essentially the customary impalement of the arms of a married couple counterchanged by fess.This claim is dubious at best.

Arms of de Lacy and de Quincy

Lacy and Quincy

Arms of John de Lacy, Earl of Lincoln 1232-1240 (c. 1192-1240) and Margaret de Quincy, Countess of Lincoln 1240-1266 (c. 1206-1266)

From p122 of Lacies Nobilitie by Sir John Ferne (1586)

Blazon: Per pale baron and femme  or and gules a bend sable and a label of three points argent (Lacy) and  gules seven mascles conjoined or 3, 3, and 1

The title to the earldom of Lincoln was carried through Margaret’s side, inherited from her mother, Hawise of Chester, who inherited the title from her brother Ranulf de Blondeville. As Margaret was the one with the initial right to the title, it returned to her in her own right after John died.

Arms of Roger de Lacy

Lacy
Baron of Halton 1199-1211 (1170-1211)

From p122 of Lacies Nobilitie by Sir John Ferne (1586)

Blazon: Per quarterly I and IV or and gules a bend sable and a label of three points argent (Lacy), II and III or a lion rampant purpre (Cotentin)

Roger received the castle and barony of Pontefract through Albreda de Lisours. (Ferne has her as Roger’s mother, but other sources point to her as his grandmother; I am not sure of their exact relationship.) He was not born a Lacy; his father, John fitz Richard, was the baron of Halton and grandson of Nigel de Cotentin. Roger assumed the Lacy name and arms as a condition of his succession to the properties of Pontefract.

For the Duke of Normandy did bear in his targe of Mars 2 Lions passant guardant of the Sun… and then, by the marriage of Eleanor, daughter and heir to William Duke of Aquitaine (that bare in a Shield gules, a Lion passant, guardant Or) the third Lion was also added to the coat of Normandy.

– From Lacies Nobilitie by Sir John Ferne (1586), p105-6

This is one of my favorite heraldic origin stories, not least because it’s very likely to be true. The blazons for Normandy and Aquitaine are easily verifiable, and the combination of those two arms into England’s iconic coat is elegant and satisfying.

Arms of Nigel of Cotentin

Cotentin
Baron of Halton c. 1071-1080 (?-1080)

From p122 of Lacies Nobilitie by Sir John Ferne (1586)

Blazon: Or a lion rampant purpre

According to Ferne, Nigel was granted the barony of Halton by his cousin Hugh Lupus for his service against the Welsh at the Battle of Rhuddlan. He also held the office of constable of Chester.

[W]hen as a Gentleman of coat-armor hath married an heir to a Gentleman of coat-armor, and hath issue by her, that issue as heir, beareth the Arms of his father and of his mother in his Shield quarterly, and it is called Coat quartered plain, or rather, a Shield quartered plain.

– From Lacies Nobilitie by Sir John Ferne (1586), p102

Ferne also goes on to describe arms diverse quarterly, where different ancestral coats are displayed in each quarter, and arms quarterly quartered, which would occur when two people with arms quartered plain marry and have children. The configuration described here is by far the most common.