Arms of Derbyshire County, England

Derbyshire

Granted 1937

Blazon: Or a rose gules surmounted by another argent, both barbed and seeded proper, on a chief sable three stags’ heads caboshed of the third

Crest: Issuant from a mural crown or a dragon wings elevated and addorsed sable holding in the dexter claw a pick of the first and collared argent

Supporters: On the dexter a stag and on the sinister a ram, both proper and gorged with a chain or pendant therefrom a rose gules surmounted by another argent, barbed and seeded also proper

Mantling: Gules lined or

Motto: Bene consulendo (By good counsel)

The double rose is referred to as the Tudor rose; Henry VII adopted it as a badge to symbolize the union of the houses of Lancaster (whose symbol was a red rose) and York (the white rose). The county previously used the Tudor rose as an unofficial device. The stag refers to the first local fort built by Danish invaders, which was named Derby after the number of deer in the region, and eventually gave its name to the county.

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Arms of the borough of Wandsworth

Wandsworth

London, England

Granted 1965

Blazon: Per pale indented argent and azure a fess chequy of the second and or, each of the last charged with a goutte of the second

Crest: On a wreath of the colors an ancient ship with a dragon’s head at the prow sable four oars in action and as many shields or on the bulwarks, flying a pennon gules and a sail of the arms

Supporters: On the dexter a dove wings elevated and addorsed azure and charged with four molets of five points or, in the beak a sprig of lavender proper; on the sinister a dragon sable wings elevated and addorsed argent and charged with four crosses couped gules

Mantling: Azure lined argent

Motto: We Serve

The field of the arms is derived from the London borough of Battersea. The fess chequy is from the arms of William de Warren, first Earl of Surrey, and the gouttes represent the tears shed by the prosecuted French Huguenots, as many of them settled in Wandsworth when fleeing persecution in the seventeenth century.

Arms of the borough of Tower Hamlets, London, England

Tower Hamlets

Granted 1965

Blazon: Argent on a base wavy azure charged with two bars wavy of the field a lymphad sail furled sable pennon and flags flying gules, on a chief of the second between a pair of fire tongs and a weaver’s shuttle a pale of the first charged with a sprig of mulberry fructed proper

Crest: On a wreath of the colors in front of a representation of the White Tower of the Tower of London proper two anchors in saltire or

Supporters: On the dexter side a sea-horse, on the sinister side a talbot, all proper

Mantling: Azure lined argent

Motto: From great things to greater

Most of the elements in this achievement are drawn from the arms of the borough of Stepney, which was incorporated into Tower Hamlets in 1965. The fire tongs are the symbol of St. Dunstan, who held the Manor of Stepney when he was Bishop of London.

Arms of the borough of Harrow

Harrow

London, England

Arms and crest granted 1938, supporters granted 1954

Blazon: Or a fess arched vert, in chief on a pile gules between a torch sable enflamed proper and a quill pen of the fourth a clarion of the field, in base issuant from a mount a wood of trees of the second

Crest: Issuant from a mural crown proper a demi-lion rampant holding between the paws an arrow fesswise argent enfiled with a wreath of oak also proper

Supporters: On the dexter a representation of Hygeia supporting with her exterior hand a staff entwined with a snake, on the sinister a Benedictine monk supporting with the exterior hand a staff, all proper

Mantling: Vert lined or

Motto: Salus populi suprema lex (The well-being of the people is the highest law)

The fess vert represents the green spaces in the borough. The torch and quill pen refer to knowledge and the famous writers of the borough (such as Lord Byron, educated at the Harrow School). The pile is drawn from the Chandos arms. The clarion supposedly refers to the borough’s connection with Handel, although he lived in Mayfair.

Arms of de Montfort and de Beaumont

Montfort and Beaumont

Arms of Simon de Montfort (? – 1188) and Amicia de Beaumont (unknown)

From p81 of Lacies Nobilitie by Sir John Ferne (1586)

Blazon: Per pale baron and femme gules a lion rampant double-queued argent and gules a cinquefoil ermine

After Amicia’s brother,  Robert de Beaumont, died in 1204, his title of Earl of Leicester passed to Amicia and Simon’s son, also named Simon. However, the younger Simon lost the earldom in 1215 when King John granted it to Ranulf de Blondeville, Earl of Chester. The younger Simon had two sons – Amaury and yet another Simon. This last Simon (Amicia’s grandson) would later convince Ranulf to cede the earldom to him in 1238, though his later rebellion against the king in the Second Baron’s War would result in the return of the title to the crown from 1265 until 1267.

Arms of the borough of Haringey

Haringey

Granted 1965

Blazon: Sable eight rays of lightning issuant from the fess point throughout or

Crest: On a wreath of the colors in front of a demi-sun in splendor or a demi-cogwheel sable

Mantling: Sable lined or

Motto: Progress with humanity

The lightning rays are intended to refer to the fact that the borough contains Alexandra Palace, from which the first the television broadcast was made.

Arms of the borough of Greenwich

Greenwich

London, England

Granted 1965

Blazon: Per chevron argent and gules in chief an hourglass proper between two estoiles of six points azure, in base three cannon barrels erect palewise proper, each charged on the breech with a lion’s face or

Motto: We govern by serving

The hourglass and estoiles refer to the Greenwich Observatory, and the cannon barrels to the Royal Arsenal.