Arms of Mössingen, Germany

Mossingen

Granted 1952

Blazon: Sable a bend wavy between in chief three escutcheons in pile argent, charged with 1 three antlers fesswise in pale, 2 two quarters, and 3 an eagle displayed of the field; in base a fountain of the second

The bend wavy represents the river Steinlach, while the fountain represents the local sulfur springs. The tinctures, as well as the second of the escutcheons in the dexter chief, refer to the house of Hohenzollern, which ruled the city until the early 15th century, when it was mortgaged to the house of Württemberg. The two houses continued fighting over the territory until 1441, when Württemberg finally won out. (Their arms are displayed on the first escutcheon in the dexter chief.) The final escutcheon shows the arms of Fürstenberg, and the arrangement of the three escutcheons represents the nearby mountain Dreifürstenstein, which borders the three territories of Hohenzollern, Württemberg, and Fürstenberg. There are also some representations of the arms that only show three escutcheons, without the details depicted here, which, though incomplete, would have been considerably easier to blazon.

 

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Arms of Anne of Bohemia

Anne of Bohemia
Queen of England 1382-1394 (1366-1394)

From p104 of Lacies Nobilitie by Sir John Ferne (1586)

Blazon: Per quarterly I and IV per quarterly i and iv azure three fleurs-de-lis or (France), ii and iii gules three lions passant guardant or armed and langued azure (England); II and III per quarterly i and iv or a double-headed eagle displayed sable armed and langued gules (Holy Roman Empire), ii and iii gules a lion rampant argent*

*Ferne describes this last coat as “the coate belonging to her family and house,” which does seem to be accurate. However, these arms seem to have originated with Anne’s grandfather, John the Blind, who quartered them with the more customary arms of Luxembourg (barry argent and azure a lion rampant double-queued gules armed, langued, and crowned or). He may have chosen to invert the tinctures of the ancient arms of the Dukes of Limburg, his ancestral line.

Torquatus points out, correctly, that this arrangement of the arms implies that Anne was an heiress, which she was not. Paradius (Ferne’s mouthpiece character) concedes the point, admitting that this arrangement is rare, but goes on to argue that this is a legitimate configuration of arms, since it is essentially the customary impalement of the arms of a married couple counterchanged by fess.This claim is dubious at best.

Arms of the House of Petrucci

Petrucci

In use since 1413? (possibly earlier)

Blazon: Bendy dancetty or and azure, on a chief of the first an eagle displayed sable

The Petruccis ruled Siena from 1487 until 1529. The name is allegedly derived from the small stature of the founder of the house, Pietro d’Altomonte, who was called by the diminutive Petruccio. The eagle in the arms may be derived from the Marescotti coat of arms, as Pietro married Giulia Marescotti.

Arms of the House of Montefeltro

Montefeltro

In use since 1444?

Blazon: Bendy of six azure and or, on a chief of the last a double-headed eagle displayed sable, armed and crowned of the second

Around 1140, the family came into possession of a castle on the hill Mons Feretrius (Hill of Jupiter Feretrius), from which the family name is derived. It seems likely that they began using the eagle in their arms (sometimes on a chief, as seen here, and sometimes on one of the bends) when they were appointed Dukes of Urbino in 1444.

Arms of Picón, Spain

Picon

Granted 1963

Blazon: Per fess argent a cross of Calatrava gules and or a double-headed eagle displayed and crowned sable

The arms in the base half of the shield are those of the Estrada family, who once controlled the region. Emperor Frederick of Germany granted these arms in 1188 to Gonzalo Fernández de Estrada, which probably explains their similarity to the German national arms.

Arms of Villingen-Schwenningen, Germany

Villingen-Schwenningen

Granted 2001

Blazon: Per pale argent and azure a fess wavy counterchanged; in the dexter chief an eagle displayed gules armed or, in the sinister chief a swan close proper

The eagle is drawn from the arms of the Zähringer family, by way of the former village of Villingen, while Schwenningen contributed its canting swan. The fess wavy symbolizes the rivers Brigach and Neckar.

Arms of Malagón, Spain

Malagon

In use since 2013

Blazon: Per quarterly I argent a cross of Calatrava gules, II or an eagle displayed sable armed and langued gules, III argent a point in point terminating in a cross paté sanguine, three molets of six points counterchanged, IV or three bars gules

The Order of Calatrava owned the region between 1180 and 1547, and the first quarter of the arms most likely reflects this fact. In the early 18th century, the area and its corresponding title Marquis of Malagón passed via marriage to the Medinaceli and Córdoba families; the arms in the last quarter are those of Córdoba.