Arms of the House of Petrucci

Petrucci

In use since 1413? (possibly earlier)

Blazon: Bendy dancetty or and azure, on a chief of the first an eagle displayed sable

The Petruccis ruled Siena from 1487 until 1529. The name is allegedly derived from the small stature of the founder of the house, Pietro d’Altomonte, who was called by the diminutive Petruccio. The eagle in the arms may be derived from the Marescotti coat of arms, as Pietro married Giulia Marescotti.

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Arms of the House of Montefeltro

Montefeltro

In use since 1444?

Blazon: Bendy of six azure and or, on a chief of the last a double-headed eagle displayed sable, armed and crowned of the second

Around 1140, the family came into possession of a castle on the hill Mons Feretrius (Hill of Jupiter Feretrius), from which the family name is derived. It seems likely that they began using the eagle in their arms (sometimes on a chief, as seen here, and sometimes on one of the bends) when they were appointed Dukes of Urbino in 1444.

Arms of Picón, Spain

Picon

Granted 1963

Blazon: Per fess argent a cross of Calatrava gules and or a double-headed eagle displayed and crowned sable

The arms in the base half of the shield are those of the Estrada family, who once controlled the region. Emperor Frederick of Germany granted these arms in 1188 to Gonzalo Fernández de Estrada, which probably explains their similarity to the German national arms.

Arms of Villingen-Schwenningen, Germany

Villingen-Schwenningen

Granted 2001

Blazon: Per pale argent and azure a fess wavy counterchanged; in the dexter chief an eagle displayed gules armed or, in the sinister chief a swan close proper

The eagle is drawn from the arms of the Zähringer family, by way of the former village of Villingen, while Schwenningen contributed its canting swan. The fess wavy symbolizes the rivers Brigach and Neckar.

Arms of Malagón, Spain

Malagon

In use since 2013

Blazon: Per quarterly I argent a cross of Calatrava gules, II or an eagle displayed sable armed and langued gules, III argent a point in point terminating in a cross paté sanguine, three molets of six points counterchanged, IV or three bars gules

The Order of Calatrava owned the region between 1180 and 1547, and the first quarter of the arms most likely reflects this fact. In the early 18th century, the area and its corresponding title Marquis of Malagón passed via marriage to the Medinaceli and Córdoba families; the arms in the last quarter are those of Córdoba.

Arms of Los Cortijos, Spain

Los Cortijos

In use since 2013

Blazon: Per fess I argent an eagle displayed sable and II per pale i per pale gules a castle triple-towered or windowed azure and argent a lion rampant gules crowned or and ii or two boars passant in pale sable

Los Cortijos split off from its parent municipality, Fuente el Fresno, in 1940. Apparently local tradition holds that the two towns began to separate when two brothers from Fuente el Fresno built their houses far away from each other.