Arms of Derbyshire County, England

Derbyshire

Granted 1937

Blazon: Or a rose gules surmounted by another argent, both barbed and seeded proper, on a chief sable three stags’ heads caboshed of the third

Crest: Issuant from a mural crown or a dragon wings elevated and addorsed sable holding in the dexter claw a pick of the first and collared argent

Supporters: On the dexter a stag and on the sinister a ram, both proper and gorged with a chain or pendant therefrom a rose gules surmounted by another argent, barbed and seeded also proper

Mantling: Gules lined or

Motto: Bene consulendo (By good counsel)

The double rose is referred to as the Tudor rose; Henry VII adopted it as a badge to symbolize the union of the houses of Lancaster (whose symbol was a red rose) and York (the white rose). The county previously used the Tudor rose as an unofficial device. The stag refers to the first local fort built by Danish invaders, which was named Derby after the number of deer in the region, and eventually gave its name to the county.

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Arms of the borough of Wandsworth

Wandsworth

London, England

Granted 1965

Blazon: Per pale indented argent and azure a fess chequy of the second and or, each of the last charged with a goutte of the second

Crest: On a wreath of the colors an ancient ship with a dragon’s head at the prow sable four oars in action and as many shields or on the bulwarks, flying a pennon gules and a sail of the arms

Supporters: On the dexter a dove wings elevated and addorsed azure and charged with four molets of five points or, in the beak a sprig of lavender proper; on the sinister a dragon sable wings elevated and addorsed argent and charged with four crosses couped gules

Mantling: Azure lined argent

Motto: We Serve

The field of the arms is derived from the London borough of Battersea. The fess chequy is from the arms of William de Warren, first Earl of Surrey, and the gouttes represent the tears shed by the prosecuted French Huguenots, as many of them settled in Wandsworth when fleeing persecution in the seventeenth century.

Arms of Sankt Georgen im Schwarzwald, Germany

Sankt Georgen

Granted 1958; in use since 1900

Blazon: Gules a representation of St. George proper armored or, mounted on a horse saliant argent, caprisoned of the second, slaying a dragon in crescent vert

The earliest depictions of the municipal arms show the arms of Baden (or a bend gules) in the chief, with the St. George and the Dragon motif in base. The Baden arms were dropped after Sankt Georgen became a city in 1891.

Arms of the House of Boncompagni-Ludovisi as Princes of Piombino

Princes of Piombino

In use since 1701?

Blazon: Per quarterly I and IV gules three demi-bendlets sinister in chief or (Ludovisi), II and III gules a demi-dragon rampant or (Boncompagni), overall on a pale argent two keys in saltire, of the field and or, surmounted by an umbraculum shaded of the last and gules, all bound in cord azure (Piombino)

An alternate form of the Boncompagni-Ludovisi arms, incorporating the insignia of Piombino.

Arms of the borough of Brent

Brent

Granted 1965

Blazon: Per chevron wavy argent gules and vert, in dexter chief an orb ensigned with a cross crosslet or, in sinister chief two swords in saltire proper, points in chief, in base as many seaxes in saltire, points in chief of the last enfiled with a Saxon crown of the fourth

Crest: Within a Saxon crown or on a mount vert a lion statant of the first charged on the shoulder with a cinquefoil gules

Supporters: On the dexter a lion or supporting a staff gules with a banner vert charged with a balance of the first; on the sinister a dragon azure supporting a staff of the third with a banner of the second charged with three lilies argent

Mantling: Gules lined argent

Motto: Forward Together

Compartment*: A grassy mound divided by water argent charged with a pale wavy azure

This achievement is largely a combination of the arms of the former boroughs of Wembley and Willesden. The former contributed the seaxes, the Saxon crown, and the lions, while the latter contributed the orb, the swords (both symbols of King Athelstan), the cinquefoil, and the dragon.

*Compartments are usually left to the discretion of the artist, not specified in the blazon.

Arms of the House of Boncompagni-Ludovisi

Boncompagni-Ludovisi

In use since 1681?

Blazon: Gules a demi-dragon rampant or, in base three demi-bendlets sinister of the last

The marriage of Gregorio Boncompagni and Ippolita Ludovisi in 1681 united the two houses in one. As the last surviving child of the Ludovisi family, Ippolita inherited her family titles and lands in 1701, and they became incorporated into the Boncompagni family.

Arms of the House of Boncompagni as Princes of Piombino

Piombino

In use since 1701?

Blazon: Gules a demi-dragon rampant or, on a chief of the field two keys in saltire, argent and or, surmounted by an umbraculum of the last, all bound in cord azure

In 1701, Gregorio Boncompagni’s marriage to Ippolita Ludovisi allowed him to claim the title Prince of Piombino. It had previously been held by Ippolita’s eldest brother Giovanni and then passed to her elder sister Olimpia when he died in 1699. Olimpia died a year later, and the title passed to her sister, and then by right of marriage, her husband. The Boncompagni-Ludovisi family would retain the principality until the French claimed it in the Battle of Marengo in 1800.

The arms in the chief are those of the Gonfalonier of the Church, though it is not clear when they became associated with the principality. It may have been during the brief window of 1501-1503 when Cesare Borgia briefly controlled the area during his tenure as Gonfalonier.