Arms of the House of Boncompagni-Ludovisi as Princes of Piombino

Princes of Piombino

In use since 1701?

Blazon: Per quarterly I and IV gules three demi-bendlets sinister in chief or (Ludovisi), II and III gules a demi-dragon rampant or (Boncompagni), overall on a pale argent two keys in saltire, of the field and or, surmounted by an umbraculum shaded of the last and gules, all bound in cord azure (Piombino)

An alternate form of the Boncompagni-Ludovisi arms, incorporating the insignia of Piombino.

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Arms of the borough of Brent

Brent

Granted 1965

Blazon: Per chevron wavy argent gules and vert, in dexter chief an orb ensigned with a cross crosslet or, in sinister chief two swords in saltire proper, points in chief, in base as many seaxes in saltire, points in chief of the last enfiled with a Saxon crown of the fourth

Crest: Within a Saxon crown or on a mount vert a lion statant of the first charged on the shoulder with a cinquefoil gules

Supporters: On the dexter a lion or supporting a staff gules with a banner vert charged with a balance of the first; on the sinister a dragon azure supporting a staff of the third with a banner of the second charged with three lilies argent

Mantling: Gules lined argent

Motto: Forward Together

Compartment*: A grassy mound divided by water argent charged with a pale wavy azure

This achievement is largely a combination of the arms of the former boroughs of Wembley and Willesden. The former contributed the seaxes, the Saxon crown, and the lions, while the latter contributed the orb, the swords (both symbols of King Athelstan), the cinquefoil, and the dragon.

*Compartments are usually left to the discretion of the artist, not specified in the blazon.

Arms of the House of Boncompagni-Ludovisi

Boncompagni-Ludovisi

In use since 1681?

Blazon: Gules a demi-dragon rampant or, in base three demi-bendlets sinister of the last

The marriage of Gregorio Boncompagni and Ippolita Ludovisi in 1681 united the two houses in one. As the last surviving child of the Ludovisi family, Ippolita inherited her family titles and lands in 1701, and they became incorporated into the Boncompagni family.

Arms of the House of Boncompagni as Princes of Piombino

Piombino

In use since 1701?

Blazon: Gules a demi-dragon rampant or, on a chief of the field two keys in saltire, argent and or, surmounted by an umbraculum of the last, all bound in cord azure

In 1701, Gregorio Boncompagni’s marriage to Ippolita Ludovisi allowed him to claim the title Prince of Piombino. It had previously been held by Ippolita’s eldest brother Giovanni and then passed to her elder sister Olimpia when he died in 1699. Olimpia died a year later, and the title passed to her sister, and then by right of marriage, her husband. The Boncompagni-Ludovisi family would retain the principality until the French claimed it in the Battle of Marengo in 1800.

The arms in the chief are those of the Gonfalonier of the Church, though it is not clear when they became associated with the principality. It may have been during the brief window of 1501-1503 when Cesare Borgia briefly controlled the area during his tenure as Gonfalonier.

Arms of London, England

London

Granted 1957; in use since before 1483

Blazon: Argent a cross gules in the first quarter a sword in pale point in chief of the last

Crest: On a wreath of the colors a dragon’s sinister wing argent charged with a cross gules

Supporters: Two dragons argent charged on the wings with a cross gules

Mantling: Gules lined argent

Motto: Domine dirige nous (God direct us)

Most of the imagery in the arms of London is connected to the patron saint of England, Saint George, and his legendary slaying of the dragon. The saint’s symbol is argent, a cross gules, which recurs throughout the arms, as does the dragon. The sword is a symbol of St. Paul, to whom the first cathedral in London was dedicated.

I couldn’t not do London. I mean, they’re famous (as famous as arms get, anyways) with a shitton of religious iconography, so I couldn’t ignore them. What I did not expect to find, though, was that the arms were not confirmed until 195freaking7. That’s over five centuries of continuous use, predating the English College of Arms itself, and no one thought to give the capital city of freaking England a grant until after the toaster oven was invented? Nintendo had been around for sixty-eight years at that point! What the actual fuck.

Arms of the House of Boncompagni

Boncompagni

In use since at least 1572, probably earlier

Blazon: Gules a demi-dragon rampant or

The House of Boncompagni originated in Umbria, but moved to Bologna in the early 14th century. The family produced one Pope, Gregory XIII, who often incorporated the dragon motif into building projects he commissioned. In 1579, he purchased the Duchy of Sora and granted it to his family. They still retain possession of it today, albeit as an honorary title.

You know, there are really not enough dragons in heraldry. It’s always lions. I mean, lions are also cool, but just look at this shit! I know absolutely nothing about when or why the Boncompagni family decided to use a dragon in their coat of arms, but I wholeheartedly support their decision. MORE DRAGONS.

Arms of Hinckley and Bosworth Borough Council, England

Hinckley and Bosworth Borough Council

Granted 1974

Blazon: Per pale indented argent and gules, on a chief or three torteaux, the center charged with a cinquefoil pierced ermine, the others charged with a mascle of the third

Crest: On a wreath of the colors a dragon gules preying on a boar passant argent

Supporters: On either side a ram reguardant sable, armed or

Mantling: Gules lined argent

Motto: Post proelia concordia (After the battle, peace)