Badges of Henry II of England

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From Inquiries into the Origin and Process of the Science of Heraldry in England by James Dallaway, p425

The left (a genet, or a small mammal resembling a civet or mongoose, between two broom plants, or genêt in French) is an allusion to Henry’s family name of Plantagenet, and the right, an escarbuncle, is derived from the arms of the House of Anjou.

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The use of arms was closely connected with the study of genealogy; and when the mode of including in the same escocheon the armorial bearing of every heir female with whom an intermarriage had been made, was universally followed, they were the more necessary to each other.

-From Inquiries into the Origin and Process of the Science of Heraldry in England by James Dallaway, p136-7

Whether from the expence and difficulty of procuring it, or from a love of novelty, the emblazoned armour did not continue long in fashion, but was succeeded by tabards of arms.

-From Inquiries into the Origin and Process of the Science of Heraldry in England by James Dalloway, p132

Procession of heralds at the funeral of Sir Philip Sidney, 1587

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From Inquiries into the Origin and Process of the Science of Heraldry in England by James Dallaway, p292

Copied from a roll by Thomas [?]

From left to right: William Segar as Portcullis, Humphrey Hales as York Herald, Nicholas Paddy as Rouge Dragon, Richard Lee as Richmond, Robert Glover as Somerset, Robert Cooke as Clarenceux King of Arms

Note the recurrence of the pheon (the charge on the Sidney coat of arms) and the full arms borne by Sir Philip on Glover’s banner.