Eagles, the ensign of the great Roman Empire were adopted very early, not perhaps on that account solely, but as being one of the hieroglypics of royalty.

– From Inquiries into the Origin and Progress of the Science of Heraldry in England by James Dallaway, p466 (1793)

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Talbots and Greyhounds are of high armorial antiquity as necessary to the chase.

– From Inquiries into the Origin and Progress of the Science of Heraldry in England by James Dallaway, p465 (1793)

From the primeval usage, the Lion has been considered as the emblem of royalty, and is probably the first, as well as the most frequent instance of the armorial delineation of an animal.

– From Inquiries into the Origin and Progress of the Science of Heraldry in England by James Dallaway, p464-5 (1793)

The chase was the school of war, being the great amusement of the military leaders during their tedious encampments; and in time of peace, it was one of the most fashionable amusements in which the Nobility and Knighthood could engage.

– From Inquiries into the Origin and Progress of the Science of Heraldry in England by James Dallaway, p464 (1793)

Wells sunk in a camp, were depicted by Sykes, a bearing composed of a roundlet azure or vert charged with three bars wavy argent, to denote undulation, as it appears at the bottom of a well.

– From Inquiries into the Origin and Progress of the Science of Heraldry in England by James Dallaway, p463 (1793)

“Sykes” are more commonly known as “fountains.”

Pheons, or arrow heads, which Skinner derives from the Saxon floene, are more common than the whole arrow. They were made of fine steel, barbed and scalloped on the inside, to increase the difficulty of extraction, and were furnished by a tenant to his chief in acknowledgement of petit serjeanty.

– From Inquiries into the Origin and Progress of the Science of Heraldry in England by James Dallaway, p463 (1793)