Arms of Ottavio Piccolomini

Piccolomini
Duke of Amalfi 1639-1656 (1599-1656)

Blazon: Per quarterly I and IV argent on a cross azure five crescents or (Piccolomini); II and III paly of four i or four palets gules (Aragon), ii barry of eight gules and argent (Hungary ancien), iii azure semé de lis or, a label of four points gules (Anjou ancien), iv argent a cross paté between four crosses or (Jerusalem)

Ottavio inherited the quarters of Aragon, Hungary ancien, Anjou ancien, and Jerusalem from his ancestor Antonio Piccolomini d’Aragona, who married Maria d’Aragona, the illegitimate daughter of Ferdinand I of Naples. Many representations have Ferdinand’s arms in the first and third quarters, as Maria’s lineage was (though illegitimate) more noble than Antonio’s.

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Arms of Malagón, Spain

Malagon

In use since 2013

Blazon: Per quarterly I argent a cross of Calatrava gules, II or an eagle displayed sable armed and langued gules, III argent a point in point terminating in a cross paté sanguine, three molets of six points counterchanged, IV or three bars gules

The Order of Calatrava owned the region between 1180 and 1547, and the first quarter of the arms most likely reflects this fact. In the early 18th century, the area and its corresponding title Marquis of Malagón passed via marriage to the Medinaceli and Córdoba families; the arms in the last quarter are those of Córdoba.

Arms of Schwäbisch Hall, Germany

Schwaebisch Hall

In use since the 13th century

Blazon: Per fess or a torteau charged with a cross paté of the field and gules a hurt fimbriated and charged with a dexter hand erect argent

The arms show both sides of the Heller, a German coin minted in the city beginning in the 13th century. The coin eventually gave its name to other units of currency in the Austro-Hungarian empire and the Czech Republic.

Arms of Louis d’Appiani d’Aragon

Louis d'Appiani

(1533-1592)

Blazon: Per quarterly I and IV  lozengy argent and gules (Appiani), II and III per quarterly i and iv tierced per pale 1 barry of eight gules and argent (Hungary ancien), 2 azure semé de lis or (France ancien), and 3 argent a cross paté between four crosses or (Jerusalem), ii and iii or four palets gules (Aragon); overall a chief gules a cross argent (Savoy)

“Louis” appears to be Alfonso d’Appiani, brother of Jacopo VI. He seems to have been a military man, possibly serving under Ferdinando II de’ Medici, Grand Duke of Tuscany.

Arms of the House of Appiani of Aragon

Appiani of Aragon

In use since 1445?

Blazon: Per quarterly I and IV  lozengy argent and gules (Appiani), II and III per quarterly i and iv tierced per pale 1 barry of eight gules and argent (Hungary ancien), 2 azure semé de lis or (France ancien), and 3 argent a cross paté between four crosses or (Jerusalem), ii and iii or four palets gules (Aragon)

The alliance between the Appianis and the house of Aragon began (informally) in 1445, when Emanuele Appiani married Colia de’ Giudici, the illegitimate daughter of King Alfonso V of Naples. His great-grandson Jacopo V also married into the house of Aragon via Marianna of Aragon in 1510, though she died before she could bear any children.

Arms of Braunstone Town Council, England

Braunstone

Granted 1976

Blazon: Gules on a fess wavy azure fimbriated or between in chief a maunch argent between two bezants and in base a cross paté argent, two shovellers close of the last

Crest: On a wreath argent and gules a stag statant resting its dexter leg on a mound of stones, all proper

Mantling: Gules lined argent

Motto: Spectemur agendo (Let us be judged by our actions)