Arms of Terrinches, Spain

Terrinches
Granted 1988

Blazon: Per pale argent a cross of Santiago gules and azure a tower of the first

These may partly be canting arms, as “Terrinches” may be derived from “Torreblanca,” or “white tower.” Alternatively, the sinister half of the arms may be a reference to the town’s defensive importance during the Reconquista. The dexter half reflects the town’s previous ownership by the Order of Santiago.

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Arms of Socuéllamos, Spain

Socuellamos
Granted 1955

Blazon: Per pale vert a tower or windowed azure and of the last a cross of Santiago gules fimbriated argent, pointé in base of the fourth a bunch of grapes of the second slipped of the first

The tower is a reference to Torre de Vejezate, a local abandoned town. The cross of Santiago reflects the fact that the land previously belonged to the Order of Santiago, and the grapes refer to the traditional industry of winemaking.

Arms of San Carlos del Valle, Spain

San Carlos del Valle
Granted 1995

Blazon: Per pale azure a representation of the local church of Christ of the Valley argent and of the last a cross of Santiago gules, pointé in base or a bunch of grapes slipped and leaved vert

The characteristic church featured on the arms was built in the sixteenth century on the site of the former hermitage of St. Helena, where (according to legend) Christ appeared in the form of a strange traveler.

Arms of Puebla del Príncipe, Spain

Puebla del Principe

Granted 1986

Blazon: Per pale vert a castle triple-towered or windowed azure and argent a cross of Santiago gules, pointé in base azure from a base proper a column argent

The Order of Santiago took possession of the region around the town in 1186, ultimately using it as a military basis during the Reconquista. They were formally granted ownership in 1243; this is likely the source of the cross of Santiago. I can only speculate that the column is a reference to the many local ruins from Roman times.

Arms of Pedro Muñoz, Spain

Pedro Munoz

In use since at least 1984

Blazon: Per quarterly I sable a cross of Santiago gules, II vert a castle triple-towered argent, windowed sable, III gules a crown or, IV azure two clasped hands, in chief a baton and sword in saltire argent

The base two quarters are both references to the previous arms, which incorporated both the crown of Charles V, Holy Roman Emperor, and the sword and baton as symbols of civil and military authority.