Arms of Pozuelo de Calatrava, Spain

Pozuelo de Calatrava

Granted 1995

Blazon: Per pale gules a well argent and of the second a cross of Calatrava of the first, pointé in base azure a loaf of bread of the second

The arms are primarily canting, due to the cross of Calatrava and the well (“pozo”), though I cannot find any explanation for the loaf of bread.

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Arms of Picón, Spain

Picon

Granted 1963

Blazon: Per fess argent a cross of Calatrava gules and or a double-headed eagle displayed and crowned sable

The arms in the base half of the shield are those of the Estrada family, who once controlled the region. Emperor Frederick of Germany granted these arms in 1188 to Gonzalo Fernández de Estrada, which probably explains their similarity to the German national arms.

Arms of Mestanza, Spain

Mestanza

 

Granted 1989

Blazon: Per fess gules a castle triple-towered or windowed azure and per pale i argent a cross of Calatrava gules and ii vert a ram and sheep statant in pale, the first or and the second argent

The ram and sheep in the arms represent the town’s history as a grazing area for the herds of the Mesta, a powerful association of Castilian sheep ranchers.

Arms of Malagón, Spain

Malagon

In use since 2013

Blazon: Per quarterly I argent a cross of Calatrava gules, II or an eagle displayed sable armed and langued gules, III argent a point in point terminating in a cross paté sanguine, three molets of six points counterchanged, IV or three bars gules

The Order of Calatrava owned the region between 1180 and 1547, and the first quarter of the arms most likely reflects this fact. In the early 18th century, the area and its corresponding title Marquis of Malagón passed via marriage to the Medinaceli and Córdoba families; the arms in the last quarter are those of Córdoba.

Arms of Luciana, Spain

Luciana

Granted 1986

Blazon: Per fess I per pale or the letters Y and F crowned sable and argent a cross of Calatrava gules and II azure a bridge of three arches argent over water in base barry wavy of the last and the field

The Y and F stand for Isabella of Castile and Fernando of Aragon, whom the blazon claims were the “true founders” of the town. (In the fifteenth century, the letters Y and I were often used interchangeably.)

Arms of Hinojosas de Calatrava, Spain

Hinojosas de Calatrava

In use since at least 2011

Blazon: Argent in dexter a cross of Calatrava gules, in sinister two branches of fennel in saltire proper; pointé in base or a representation of St. Bernard of Clairvaux nimbed and bearing in the dexter hand a shepherd’s crook and in the sinister an open book also proper, robed gules

Like so many other municipalities in the region, Hinojosas de Calatrava belonged to the Order of Calatrava after Reconquista. As well as the symbol of the Order, the arms also include a canting element (“hinojo” meaning “fennel” in Spanish) and a representation of the patron saint of the town.