Arms of Torralba de Calatrava, Spain

Torralba de Calatrava

Granted 1975

Blazon: Per fess argent a cross of Calatrava gules and azure a tower of the first

Whatever kind of shade some ancient writers throw on canting arms, I love them. It’s like all the best parts of puns and linguistics put together! It’s especially satisfying when every element of the arms matches a component of the name in question. The “de Calatrava” clearly corresponds to the cross of Calatrava, from the military order that occupied much of the south of Spain during Reconquista. The first part of the name is covered in the base half of the arms – “torre alba” being a rather poetic way of saying “white tower” in Spanish. It’s possible the white tower in question is a direct reference to the town’s old fortress (which had a church built on it more than 500 years ago), but that’s pure speculation.

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Arms of Solana del Pino, Spain

Solana del Pino
Granted 1985

Blazon: Or issuant from a base a stone pine tree proper between a stag and a mountain goat statant respectant sable, in chief a cross of Calatrava gules

The name and arms are a reference to the abundance of stone pines in the area, which is unusual for the climate.

Arms of San Lorenzo de Calatrava, Spain

San Lorenzo de Calatrava
Granted 1991

Blazon: Per fess argent a cross of Calatrava gules and or a grill fesswise sable, in base a palm branch embowed proper

The grill is a symbol of St. Lawrence, the patron saint of the town, who was roasted to death. The first records of the town date back to 1588, when a group of peasants told King Felipe II that they were unable to attend Mass because they lived too far from a church.

Arms of Picón, Spain

Picon

Granted 1963

Blazon: Per fess argent a cross of Calatrava gules and or a double-headed eagle displayed and crowned sable

The arms in the base half of the shield are those of the Estrada family, who once controlled the region. Emperor Frederick of Germany granted these arms in 1188 to Gonzalo Fernández de Estrada, which probably explains their similarity to the German national arms.