Arms of Warwickshire County, England

Warwickshire

Granted 1931

Blazon: Gules a bear erect argent muzzled of the field collared and chained or supporting a staff raguly of the second, the chain reflexed over the back and encircling the staff; on a chief of the third three cross crosslets of the first; the shield ensigned with a mural crown or

Motto: Non sanz droict (Not without right)

The bear and staff have been used as symbols of the Earls of Warwick since at least 1268. One source gives their origin in medieval legend; the name of one Earl of Warwick, Arthgallus, was supposedly derived from “arthos,” or “bear”, and another was said to have used a broken tree branch to kill a giant. (There is no solid proof for either of these assertions.)

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Arms of the borough of Brent

Brent

Granted 1965

Blazon: Per chevron wavy argent gules and vert, in dexter chief an orb ensigned with a cross crosslet or, in sinister chief two swords in saltire proper, points in chief, in base as many seaxes in saltire, points in chief of the last enfiled with a Saxon crown of the fourth

Crest: Within a Saxon crown or on a mount vert a lion statant of the first charged on the shoulder with a cinquefoil gules

Supporters: On the dexter a lion or supporting a staff gules with a banner vert charged with a balance of the first; on the sinister a dragon azure supporting a staff of the third with a banner of the second charged with three lilies argent

Mantling: Gules lined argent

Motto: Forward Together

Compartment*: A grassy mound divided by water argent charged with a pale wavy azure

This achievement is largely a combination of the arms of the former boroughs of Wembley and Willesden. The former contributed the seaxes, the Saxon crown, and the lions, while the latter contributed the orb, the swords (both symbols of King Athelstan), the cinquefoil, and the dragon.

*Compartments are usually left to the discretion of the artist, not specified in the blazon.

Arms of de Gant and Roumare

Gant and Roumare

Arms of Gilbert de Gant, Earl of Lincoln c. 1149-1156 and Baron of Lindsey 1095-1156 (c. 1126-1156), and ‘Hawise de Roumare’

From p30 of Lacies Nobilitie by Sir John Ferne (1586)

Blazon: Per pale, baron and femme; the first or three barrulets azure surmounted by a bend gules, the second gules seven mascles 3, 3, and 1 between ten cross crosslets or 3, 4, 2, and 1

Ferne asserts that Gilbert married one Hawise de Roumare, William’s daughter, and thereby obtained the title Earl of Lincoln. This does not seem to be borne out by the historical record. First, William de Roumare only had one recorded child, a son who was also named William. Hawise was the name of de Roumare’s wife, so Ferne may be conflating the two. Moreover, Gilbert de Gant certainly did not marry into the earldom; when de Roumare took the Empress Matilda’s side during the Anarchy, King Stephen granted the title to de Gant (around 1149 or 1150). Ferne goes out of his way to insist that King Stephen only created de Gant Earl of Lincoln after he married de Roumare’s daughter in accordance with the laws of marriage and inheritance, but given that there is no evidence of a Roumare daughter, this seems improbable (and probably colored by Ferne’s open disdain for King Stephen). He may be conflating de Gant’s wife with Hawise of Chester, who was created the first countess of Lincoln in her own right in 1232.

Arms of William de Roumare

de Roumare

Earl of Lincoln 1143-1153? (1096-1153?)

From p30 of Lacies Nobilitie by Sir John Ferne (1586)

Blazon: Gules seven mascles 3, 3, and 1 between ten cross crosslets or 3, 4, 2, and 1

Ferne’s herald character Paradius claims that the mascle is supposed to represent the holes of a net and marks the bearer as “most prudent and politic in the warres… had with some notable stratageme or acte circumvented the enemy.” The color and number of the mascles is also supposed to hold meaning; or means that he was rewarded with material goods, and seven (the Biblical number of perfection) means that his honor was “most perfect, and without reproach.” The cross crosslets or allegedly represented someone devoted to Christ’s sacrifice and who “esteemed of it as most great riches.” (33-4) More probably, the cross crosslets in de Roumare’s arms are a representation of his service against “the Sarazens and Infidels.” (35)

Arms of Waltham Abbey Town Council, England

Waltham Abbey

Granted 1956

Blazon: Argent on a cross engrailed sable a lion’s head caboshed between four cross crosslets or

Crest: Out of a coronet of fleurs-de-lis or a demi-stag at gaze proper charged on the shoulder with a fountain and holding in the mouth a seaxe argent pommel and hilt or

Mantling: Gules lined argent

Motto: Sanctae nomine crucis (The Holy Cross by name)

Arms of Stockport Metropolitan Borough Council, England

Granted 1932 (arms) and 1959 (supporters)

Blazon: Azure semé of cross crosslets three lozenges within a bordure or charged with three garbs and four double-headed eaglets azure alternately of the first

Crest: Issuant from a mural crown or a mount vert thereon a castle of two towers proper

Mantling: Azure lined or

Supporters: Two lions rampant argent gorged with a collar vairy gules and or pendant therefrom by a chain of the last, on the dexter a plate charged with a rose gules barbed and seeded of the second, on the sinister a hurt charged with a garb of the last

Motto: Anime et fide (With courage and faith)