Arms of Puebla del Príncipe, Spain

Puebla del Principe

Granted 1986

Blazon: Per pale vert a castle triple-towered or windowed azure and argent a cross of Santiago gules, pointé in base azure from a base proper a column argent

The Order of Santiago took possession of the region around the town in 1186, ultimately using it as a military basis during the Reconquista. They were formally granted ownership in 1243; this is likely the source of the cross of Santiago. I can only speculate that the column is a reference to the many local ruins from Roman times.

Advertisements

Arms of Lezuza, Spain

Lezuza

In use since at least 1991

Blazon: Gules a castle triple-towered or windowed azure between the pillars of Hercules argent, capitals and bases of the second, intertwined with two banners of the third, charged with the mottos on the dexter “Non Plus” and on the sinister “Ultra”* of the second, in base a stone road leading to the castle door in perspective of the fourth, thereupon six crows close in fess sable, in chief two heads couped and nimbed proper, all within a bordure of the fourth charged with the motto “Colonia Libisosanorum”** of the fifth

*Nothing further beyond

**Libisosa, an ancient city in the region. Ptolemy and various others refer to it in their writings.

Arms of Salamanca, Spain (province)

In use since 1996

Blazon: Per quarterly, I azure three columns or 2 and 1 (Ciudad Rodrigo), II azure five bees volant in saltire or (Béjar), III argent five castles in saltire or, masoned sable, windowed azure (Peñaranda de Bracamonte), IV argent a sword in bend sinister proper surmounted by a feather in bend gules, in chief a passion cross paté azure (Vitigudino); overall a roundel per pall, i argent two lions’ heads combatant issuant from the partition line proper langued gules, ii argent on a bridge proper dexter a bull passant sable and sinister a tree eradicated vert, iii or four palets gules within a bordure azure charged with eight crosses paté argent (Salamanca)