Former arms of Poltringen, Germany

Poltringen

Granted 1933 – 1971

Blazon: Argent a boar passant sable, armed of the field on a triple mount in base proper, in chief a cinquefoil gules

Both elements of the arms evidently derive from the Counts of Eberstein, an ancient regional family that died out in 1660. The cinquefoil was from their coat of arms (argent a cinquefoil gules seeded azure), and the boar (Eber) is a canting element on their name.

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Arms of the Earl and Countess of Lincoln

Lincoln
Arms of John de Lacy, Earl of Lincoln 1232-1240 (c. 1192-1240) and Margaret de Quincy, Countess of Lincoln 1232-1266, suo jure 1240-1266 (c. 1206-1266)

From p114 of Lacies Nobilitie by Sir John Ferne (1586)

Blazon: Per pale baron and femme I per quarterly i and iv per quarterly or and gules a bend sable and a label of three points argent (Lacy), ii and iii or a lion rampant purpre (Nigold/Neale), II per quarterly i gules seven mascles conjoined or 3, 3, and 1 (Quincy), ii per pale azure three garbs or (Chester) and azure a wolf’s head erased argent (d’Avranches), iii gules a cinquefoil ermine (Beaumont), iv gules a pale or (Grandmesnil)

You may recognize the baron’s arms as those of Roger de Lacy, Baron of Halton and Pontefract; John was his eldest son. They were jointly created Countess and Earl of Lincoln in 1232. The grant was mostly due to Margaret, as the title had previously been held by her mother Hawise of Chester. Thus, John was only Earl of Lincoln by right of his wife, and when he died in 1240, she retained her title in her own right.

Arms of de Montfort and de Beaumont

Montfort and Beaumont

Arms of Simon de Montfort (? – 1188) and Amicia de Beaumont (unknown)

From p81 of Lacies Nobilitie by Sir John Ferne (1586)

Blazon: Per pale baron and femme gules a lion rampant double-queued argent and gules a cinquefoil ermine

After Amicia’s brother,  Robert de Beaumont, died in 1204, his title of Earl of Leicester passed to Amicia and Simon’s son, also named Simon. However, the younger Simon lost the earldom in 1215 when King John granted it to Ranulf de Blondeville, Earl of Chester. The younger Simon had two sons – Amaury and yet another Simon. This last Simon (Amicia’s grandson) would later convince Ranulf to cede the earldom to him in 1238, though his later rebellion against the king in the Second Baron’s War would result in the return of the title to the crown from 1265 until 1267.

Arms of de Quincy and de Beaumont

Quincy and Beaumont

Arms of Saer de Quincy, Earl of Winchester and (1170 – 1219) and Margaret de Beaumont (unknown)

From p81 of Lacies Nobilitie by Sir John Ferne (1586)

Blazon: Per pale baron and femme gules seven mascles 3, 3, and 1 or and gules a cinquefoile ermine

Since Saer de Quincy married one of the two heiresses of the de Beaumont family, he was entitled to bear the arms of the Beaumonts marshalled with his own. (Margaret’s brother, Robert de Beaumont, Earl of Leicester, died in 1204.) However, since Margaret was the younger sister, the title Earl of Leicester passed to her older sister’s husband.

[Sir William de Tankerville] recieved as great an advancement in the bearing of his coat, which for the taking of [Robert Bosne, Earl of Leicester and Count of Meulan] prisoner, did assume Gules an escutcheon Argent within an Orle of 8 Cinquefoils Argent.

– From Lacies Nobility by Sir John Ferne (1586), p72

Robert and his father bore gules a cinquefoil ermine, hence the orle of cinquefoils.

Arms of Robert de Beaumont

de Beaumont

First Earl of Leicester and Count of Meulan (1040/1050 – 1118)

From p80 of Lacies Nobilitie by Sir John Ferne (1586)

Blazon: Gules a cinquefoil ermine

Robert de Beaumont accompanied William of Normandy into England. He was created the first Earl of Leicester by Henry I in 1107. Ferne holds him in very high regard, particularly for his anti-Papal stance during the Investiture Controversy. As for his arms, Ferne states that “This Cinquefoil Ermine in a field of Mars portendeth the first bearer thereof to have merited honor, as well by the exercise of chivalry and war, as by the proof and excellency of his wisdom.” (72)