Arms of Hamon Bonet

Hamon Bonet

From the Dering Roll (c. 1270-1300)

Blazon: Chequy gules and or a chief azure

The Bonets were a family of knights hailing from Sussex. In addition to Hamon, we also have records of a Sir Robert Bonet as owning Wappingthorn Manor in Steyning. The family continued to hold the manor until the mid-1360s, when it passed to the Wilcombe family, who had married into the Bonets. By 1399, the Wilcombes had lost possession of Wappingthorn to the Codingtons, though it was back with Alice Wilcombe and her husband John Leeds by 1427.

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Arms of Dietmanns, Austria

Dietmanns
In use since at least 1965

Blazon: Gules four palets argent and a chief of the last chequy of the field, overall issuant from a mount in base a pine tree proper surmounted by a baton in bend sinister, interwoven with the palets or

The town has been in existence since 1496, with official incorporation coming in 1783. The region’s lush pine forests may be the source for the tree in the arms.

Arms of the House of Petrucci

Petrucci

In use since 1413? (possibly earlier)

Blazon: Bendy dancetty or and azure, on a chief of the first an eagle displayed sable

The Petruccis ruled Siena from 1487 until 1529. The name is allegedly derived from the small stature of the founder of the house, Pietro d’Altomonte, who was called by the diminutive Petruccio. The eagle in the arms may be derived from the Marescotti coat of arms, as Pietro married Giulia Marescotti.

Arms of the borough of Amber Valley

Amber Valley

Derbyshire, England

Granted 1989

Blazon: Vert a pale wavy or within a bordure argent charged with five horseshoes sable, on a chief of the second between two lozenges a cresset sable fired proper

Crest: On a wreath of the colors the battlements of a tower proper issuant therefrom between two croizers or an oak tree also proper fructed and ensigned by a crown of fleurs-de-lis of the first

Supporters: On the dexter a unicorn argent armed and crined or gorged with a collar pendant therefrom a cross flory gules; on the sinister a leopard proper gorged with a collar gules pendant therefrom a fleur-de-lis or

Mantling: Vert lined or

Motto: Per laborem progredimur (By hard work we progress)

The pale wavy evidently represents the river Amber, while the lozenges and cresset symbolize the coal and iron industries. The horseshoes on the bordure are taken from (one of the versions of) the arms of the Ferrers family.

Arms of the House of Montefeltro

Montefeltro

In use since 1444?

Blazon: Bendy of six azure and or, on a chief of the last a double-headed eagle displayed sable, armed and crowned of the second

Around 1140, the family came into possession of a castle on the hill Mons Feretrius (Hill of Jupiter Feretrius), from which the family name is derived. It seems likely that they began using the eagle in their arms (sometimes on a chief, as seen here, and sometimes on one of the bends) when they were appointed Dukes of Urbino in 1444.

Arms of Warwickshire County, England

Warwickshire

Granted 1931

Blazon: Gules a bear erect argent muzzled of the field collared and chained or supporting a staff raguly of the second, the chain reflexed over the back and encircling the staff; on a chief of the third three cross crosslets of the first; the shield ensigned with a mural crown or

Motto: Non sanz droict (Not without right)

The bear and staff have been used as symbols of the Earls of Warwick since at least 1268. One source gives their origin in medieval legend; the name of one Earl of Warwick, Arthgallus, was supposedly derived from “arthos,” or “bear”, and another was said to have used a broken tree branch to kill a giant. (There is no solid proof for either of these assertions.)